Yourwellness Magazine Explores Teaching Children About Failure

With Ofsted’s chief inspector warning that a ‘culture’ of teachers tolerating misbehaviour and inattention in schools may lead to children failing in education, Yourwellness Magazine explored how it is a good thing to teach children about failure.

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London, UK (PRWEB UK) 23 December 2013

Ofsted’s chief inspector has warned that a ‘culture’ of teachers tolerating misbehaviour and inattention in schools may lead to children failing in education, The Telegraph reported December 11th. The article, “Teachers 'tolerating misbehaviour' in schools, warns Ofsted chief,” noted that, in a speech to launch an upcoming Ofsted report, Sir Michael Wilshaw will disclose that around 700,000 pupils attend schools where the behaviour of children is judged to be in need of improvement. Sir Michael will comment, ‘Unless this changes, teachers will struggle to create an environment in which all children learn well.’ (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/10509118/Teachers-tolerating-misbehaviour-in-schools-warns-Ofsted-chief.html)

With this in mind, Yourwellness Magazine explored why it’s so important to teach children about failure and its consequences. Yourwellness Magazine commented, ‘In the game of life, sometimes you win, and sometimes you lose – but do your children need to know that? Many schools and clubs have policies in which “keeping score” at sporting events isn’t allowed, but does this set your children up for a shocking realisation later in life? According to Jeff Bogle, author of The Good Men Project blog, for the sake of family wellness, and your child’s future wellbeing, parents should let their kids fail.’ (http://www.yourwellness.com/2013/12/thats-life-should-you-teach-your-children-how-to-fail/#sthash.XL6gxc88.dpuf)

Yourwellness Magazine noted the views of Bogle, who argued that his kids have ‘had explained to them the implications contained within the notion that with all efforts big and small – in the classroom, on the playing field, growing up – there are bound to be failures, but present in those moments of extreme disappointment and blood-curdling frustration, is the truth. The truth about themselves, about their passion (or lack there of) for the thing they are attempting to do, and about how the world sees them and how much weight to give the opinions of others.’

To find out more, visit the gateway to living well at http://www.yourwellness.com.


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