Fashion Illustration Creates Its Mark in Today's Contemporary Art World

Fashion Illustrator Barbara Tyler Ahlfield stakes new turf in the contemporary art scene by the creation of a series of fashion-inspired oil paintings which will be exhibited at Artexpo/SOLO New York 2014. The series will convey the natural progression of the artist from a career in commercial art to a fresh expression in fine art.

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'It is important to evolve with the times and find the audience for your work. I am looking forward to showcasing my most recent fashion-inspired oil paintings collection, entitled 'POSE' in the upcoming Artexpo/Solo in 2014,' stated Ahlfield.

Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) December 24, 2013

Barbara Tyler Ahlfield, a leading retail fashion illustrator, announces the completion of her latest collection, "POSE," to be exhibited at Artexpo/SOLO New York 2014. This debut represents Barbara's artistic evolution from a 30-year retail fashion legacy as a leading American retail fashion illustrator to a creator of large- scaled, fashion-themed oil paintings.

While dramatically different in medium, size, design and impact, "POSE" integrates certain key elements of fashion illustration- dramatic posing, elongated figures, "romancing" of fabric and beautiful, on-trend models- and then carries them forward in this new mode of artistic expression.

"It is important to evolve with the times and find the audience for your work. I am looking forward to showcasing my most recent fashion-inspired collection of oil paintings- entitled "POSE"- in the upcoming Artexpo in 2014,” stated Barbara Tyler Ahlfield.

Retail fashion illustration has evolved from drawings of seasonal fashions used for print advertising into a stand-alone art form in the modern art world. Over the last seventy- five years, newspapers and magazines displayed hand-drawn illustrations advertising apparel manufactured by top fashion designers as well as moderately-priced department store fashion merchandise. All department stores contained their own advertising departments with several in-house staff fashion illustrators.

Retail Fashion illustration was once a "destination occupation" which required experience, talent and skill to deliver a beautiful piece of art that could also sell merchandise. With the demise of bricks and mortar retail and the ascendance of digital art, traditional fashion art has sought new avenues of expression.

For more information on Barbara Tyler Ahlfield and her illustrations, please visit: http://www.fashionillustrationandmore.com/.

About Barbara Tyler Ahlfield:

Barbara started drawing at the age of two and was soon decorating her bedroom walls with crayon fashion drawings. As a child she was fascinated with the glamorous fashion she saw in the old black and white films on Television as well as the formal portraits she studied during children’s classes at the Rochester Memorial Art Gallery. Following college, she united her loves of art and fashion into a career that spanned 30 years as one of the leading, award winning retail fashion illustrators in the country.

The archive of her illustrations is one of the few existing collections of American fashion illustration over the last quarter century and offers a retrospective of the American woman’s changing sense of style as well as changing illustrative styles. On any given day her full page illustrations appeared in many of the major newspapers in the country including the New York Times, Chicago Sun Times, Washington Post, Philadelphia Inquirer, etc. showcasing top American fashion designers for the major US department stores such as Lord and Taylor, Nordstrom, Dillards, John Wannamaker and many more. For more information, please visit: http://www.fashionillustrationandmore.com/.