IEA Roadmap reinforces ICCA findings on untapped potential energy efficiency gains in buildings

Chemicals sector can play role in high-tech materials to lower GHG emissions by 70%.

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ICCA

"Buildings offer the largest potential for energy and GHG savings at the lowest cost while providing the highest ratio of local employment gains per unit of investment."

Brussels, Belgium (PRWEB UK) 20 December 2013

The Energy Efficient Building Envelope Technology Roadmap, released today by The International Energy Agency (IEA) demonstrates the important role existing building materials and technologies – such as insulation, reflective roof coatings, and windows – play in achieving substantial energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions for the buildings sector.

Those building materials and technologies – many of which are made possible by innovations in chemistry – are highlighted in both the IEA report as well as the ICCA Building Technology Roadmap published in the 2012. The ICCA roadmap estimated that ambitious energy efficiency improvements in buildings using existing technologies combined with lower-carbon fuels could lead to a 41% reduction in energy use and a 70% reduction in GHG emissions by 2050. The cumulative net GHG savings in Europe, Japan and the United States from the use of chemically based building products could be 30 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalents (MtCO2e) – an average annual savings of 600 MtCO2e or the equivalent level of emissions from the annual electricity use of 75 million homes.

Russel Mills, ICCA Energy and Climate Group Vice Chair, said: “Buildings offer the largest potential for energy and GHG savings at the lowest cost while providing the highest ratio of local employment gains per unit of investment. Increasing partnerships and cooperation with the chemical industry will help accelerate important progress in this topic for the benefit of the environment, economy and society.”


Contact

  • James Pieper
    ICCA
    +32 2 6767398
    Email