"Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here" Exhibition Opening at the San Francisco Center for the Book on Friday, February 1, 2013

An exhibition of fifty-five artists books – exhibited at the San Francisco Center for the Book – created in response the the March 5, 2007 bombing of Al-Mutanabbi Street, the street of poets and booksellers, in Baghdad, Iran

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Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: An Exhbition of Fifty Five Artists Books

"The connection between the booksellers and readers on Al-Mutanabbi Street and the booksellers and readers here is very simple and direct. We all share the belief that books are the holders of memories, dreams, and ideas" ~Beau Beausoleil

San Francisco, California (PRWEB) February 01, 2013

The San Francisco Center for the Book is exhibiting a selection of fifty-five artists books from the 250 book collection of the "Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here" collection.

In July 2010, Beau Beausoleil put out a call for book artists to join ‘An Inventory Of Al-Mutanabbi Street’, a project to “re-assemble” some of the “inventory” of the reading material that was lost in the car bombing of al-Mutanabbi Street on 5th March 2007. This collection of books is a result of the call to artists to join the Al-Mutanabbi Street project and further enhance the previous work of the Coalition by honouring al-Mutanabbi Street, through creating work that holds both “memory and future,” exactly what was lost that day.

On March 5th 2007, a car bomb was exploded on al-Mutanabbi Street in Baghdad. Al-Mutanabbi Street is in a mixed Shia-Sunni area. More than 30 people were killed and more than 100 were wounded. Al-Mutanabbi Street, the historic center of Baghdad bookselling, holds bookstores and outdoor bookstalls, cafes, stationery shops, and even tea and tobacco shops. It has been the heart and soul of the Baghdad literary and intellectual community.

The coalition asked each Book Artist who joined the project to complete three books (or other paper material) over the course of a year, books that reflected both the strength and fragility of books, but also showed the endurance of the ideas within them. The coalition asked for work that reflected both the targeted attack on this “street of the booksellers” as well as the ultimate futility of those who try to erase thought.

A complete set of all the books will be donated to the Iraq National Library in Baghdad. The other two sets are touring for the next few years in conjunction with shows of the broadsides as well as in shows of their own.

The inventory of al-Mutanabbi Street was as diverse as the Iraqi population, including literature of both Iraq and the Middle East, history, political theory, popular novels, scholarly works, religious tracts, technical books, poetry, mysteries; even stationery and blank school notebooks could be purchased on this street, as well as children’s books, comics, and magazines. Arabic was of course the predominate language but books in Farsi, French, German, and English were also represented. Because books have their own journeys, ones quite unknown to us, there were also a few books in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Dutch, or Italian, as well as classic Greek and Latin, Hindi, or even Russian.

This project is both a lament and a commemoration of the singular power of words. The coalition asked that the work move within these parameters. It is hoped that the books created would use al-Mutanabbi and its printers, writers, booksellers, and readers, as a touchstone and make visible the literary bridge that connects us. A bridge made of words and images that move back and forth between the readers in Iraq and the United States and beyond. These books will show the commonality of al-Mutanabbi Street with any street, anywhere that holds a bookstore or cultural institution.

"And that this attack (part of a long history of attacking the printed word) was an attack on us all." ~Sarah Bodman

The Al-Mutanabbi Street Coalition is not an anti-war project, nor is it a healing project. The coalition feels that until it is truly seen, what happened on this one winding street of booksellers and readers, on this one day in Baghdad, until it is understood what all the implications of an attack on the printed word and its writers, printers, booksellers and readers, until it is seen that this is everyone's street, until then, the coalition can't truly move forward.

The "Al-Mutanabbi Starts Here" exhbition opens on Friday, February 1, 2013 at the San Francisco Center for the Book from 6:00 - 8:00pm and runs through May 11, 2013.

About the San Francisco Center for the Book

The San Francisco Center for the Book fosters the joys of books and bookmaking, the history, artistry, and continuing presence of books in our culture and enduring importance as a medium of self-expression. We provide both a home for Bay Area book artists and a place where the wider community can discover book arts. Everyone is welcome here, experienced practitioners and newcomers alike. Over 300 workshops annually offer learning at all levels: from introductory to focused advanced courses spanning traditional bookbinding, cutting-edge printing techniques and experimental book forms. Exhibitions are designed to inform and inspire visitors. Free public programs include opening receptions for the exhibition program, poetry readings, book release parties for our publications, gallery talks, Open Houses and other community events like the annual Earth Day Extravaganza and Roadworks Street Fair.
For more information go to sfcb.org

About the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Project

Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here is a project of Beau Beausoleil and Sarah Bodman. Beau Beausoleil is a poet and bookseller in San Francisco, California. Sarah is Senior Research Fellow for Artists' Books at the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR), where she runs projects investigating and promoting contemporary book arts.

The inventory of al-Mutanabbi Street was as diverse as the Iraqi population, including literature of both Iraq and the Middle East, history, political theory, popular novels, scholarly works, religious tracts, technical books, poetry, mysteries; even stationery and blank school notebooks could be purchased on this street, as well as children’s books, comics, and magazines. Arabic was of course the predominate language but books in Farsi, French, German, and English were also represented. Because books have their own journeys, ones quite unknown to us, there were also a few books in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Dutch, or Italian, as well as classic Greek and Latin, Hindi, or even Russian. For more information, go to http://www.bookarts.uwe.ac.uk/mutanmain12.htm


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Attachments

Felicia Rice | Al Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at the San Francisco Center for the Book Felicia Rice | Al Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at the San Francisco Center for the Book

An excerpt from 'Five Hymns to Pain', 2012 Felicia Rice, USA


Evidence Vol. 48, 6134, 27, 537, 1129 2011 Ania Gilmore & Annie Zeybekoglu, USA Evidence Vol. 48, 6134, 27, 537, 1129 2011 Ania Gilmore & Annie Zeybekoglu, USA

the echo of the senseless bombing on March 5, 2007 of Al-Mutanabbi Street in Baghdad, the historic center of the Baghdad literary, cultural, and intellectual community. One patiently gathered up pages that survived the blast, and then brought them back to


Witness, 2012 Miriam Schaer, USA Witness, 2012 Miriam Schaer, USA

Witness from a New York Times article that described the bombing of Baghdad’s historic street of booksellers during the American occupation of Iraq in 2007. I started by running the text of the original article through every language available on Google T


The Iraqi BookSeller 2012 Laurie Szujewska, USA The Iraqi BookSeller 2012 Laurie Szujewska, USA

The Iraqi Bookseller is inspired by The Bookseller’s Story Ending Much too Soon, an article written by Anthony Shadid for the Washington Post Foreign Service on March 12, 2007. Shadid’s story is a personal account of the Mutannabi Street bombing told thro