Was Richard III really that bad? As the battle for where he should be re-buried continues, PR Company says it could have helped improve his image

Richard III is one of the most notorious monarchs in British history and regarded as one its worst tyrants - but what would Crisis Management specialists Lexicon PR have done to alter that widely held perception?

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Shakespeare and the Tudors really did a number on Richard III

Leeds, Yorkshire (PRWEB UK) 8 February 2013

Richard III is one of the most notorious monarchs in British history and regarded as one its worst tyrants - but what would Crisis Management specialists Lexicon PR have done to alter that widely held perception?

If there is one figure in British history whose reputation needs enhancing, then it is the much vilified Richard III, the subject of the news across the world this week as his body was exhumed amid great furore in regards to where he should be re-buried. Against him, though, are the Tudor PR machine that did so much to malign their conquered enemy, one of the most caustic characterisations in the history of literature and theatre as written by Shakespeare, prejudices in regards to his physical appearance and unanswered questions in relation to one of the most notorious murder cases in history - the Princes of the Tower.

Lexicon cites proactive PR, Twitter and even a relaxed interview with Philip Schofield and Holly Willoughby as examples of what Richard III could do to improve and soften his image if he were living and reigning today.

Lexicon feels in particular that he should have been more vocal about some of the very positive reforms he introduced - such as instituting what later became known as the ‘Court of Requests’, a court to which poor people who could not afford legal representation could apply for their grievances to be heard - and also not have allowed rumours about his involvement in the disappearance of the Princes of the Tower to snowball into rebellion by trying to ignore the whispers - ultimately in vain - until they went away. Lexicon’s full proposal for handling Richard III’s PR can be found here.

Sue Baker, Managing Director of Lexicon PR, said: “Shakespeare and the Tudors really did a number on Richard III.

“Not that we would want to be seen to be working for a supposedly murderous tyrant, but we wanted to put forward some of the PR ideas that we would have encouraged Richard III to put into practice to enhance and ultimately save what is a pretty rotten reputation.

“The news of what is believed to be his body have been dug up after some 500 years was quickly followed by the public talking about what an awful person and king he was, which just goes to prove that not enough has been done to demonstrate how many really positive, excellent things he actually did during his reign.”

Sue Baker and her husband, former university law lecturer Nigel, founded Lexicon PR 25 years ago. The agency is based near Ilkley on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, and its clients range from US-based SaaS (software as a solution) technology providers to Yorkshire Dales farming businesses and from the world’s leading supplier of prams and nursery equipment to UK-based niche manufacturers. Lexicon is known as a specialist in crisis management, protecting its clients’ reputations in the face of negative press in an ethical and above-board manner and is also expert in creating proactive publicity for B2C and B2B businesses using both traditional PR and social media.

http://www.lexiconpr.com

Tel: 0845 456 2106

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  • Rory ffoulkes
    Lexicon Public Relations Limited
    +44 1943 830 626
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