Nashville Start-Up Populr.me Breaks Laws of Probability

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On February 8, 2013, CEO Nicholas Holland of Nashville-based start-up Populr.me, reported revenue of over $30,000 generated during it's beta phase. A task that is considered highly-improbable for any tech start-up to achieve during start-up, let alone, a beta phase.

On February 8, 2013, CEO Nicholas Holland of Nashville-based start-up Populr.me, reported revenue of over $30,000 generated during it's beta phase. A task that is considered highly-improbable for any tech start-up to achieve during start-up, let alone, a beta phase.

Why is revenue so uncommon for a tech-based start-up? Simple. Companies like Facebook, Google, Trello and even Populr.me are following a business model thought to have been created by tech-giant, Google. An experience by which users are given sometimes full-access to a software's features and functions, only to reach a threshold by which the service stops, or requires some form of payment to continue usage.

According to Wikipedia, as of June 2012, there are over 425 million registered Gmail users. Few of which, are paying for the service. Google's formula appears to be simple:

Give users unlimited, free access to most or all of a software's features and functions for a period long enough to make it irreplaceable. Then, charge for continued usage and/or advanced functionality.

In the case of Gmail, users are given 10 GB of free space in which to send, receive and store emails, many of which have attachments such as MP3's, PDF's, and other forms of online media. Once the 10 GB limit has been reached, the user is forced to pay for additional storage for continued usage of the software.

Another source of revenue for many start-up's is online advertisements. In the case of Gmail, these can be seen at both the top and the right-hand side of the software. Often times, these advertisements relate directly to what's been typed in both your incoming and outgoing email messages. “It's actually scary how often the ads in Gmail will relate directly to the messages in my inbox”, according to Tim Bourke, a frequent Gmail user.

This one of many reasons Populr.me's revenue is so unusual. Their revenue stream is from users who simply wanted the ability to create more “published one-pagers”, or “Pop's”, as Populr.me users refer to them. Free Populr users gain access to most of the features and functions, and each user is allowed to create up to three Pop's at no charge. The revenue Populr.me generated was from individuals and organizations who realized the need for creating more than three Pop's, or to unlock the many advanced functions the software offers its paid users. Here are three of the functions paid-users enjoy:

     1    Tracers – A simple way to measure (and be notified) when a Pop has been visited, and which media is interacted with.
     2    Password-protected Pop's – Giving specified access to private Pop's
     3    Collaboration – Building and managing Pop's in teams.

Populr.me was founded by Nashville technology leader, Nicholas Holland, who is also the CEO for one of the nation's most respected interactive agencies, CentreSource.

According to Mr. Holland, “Unlike many start-up technology companies, our goal is to become profitable in the shortest period of time possible. We feel we can give users the ability to communicate with impact at every level, including our free users. Our paid users simply enjoy unlimited creativity, many advanced features, and do so at a very reasonable price”.

Interested in making your own “published one-page” presentations? Visit http://www.Populr.me (Popular without the “a”) and click the “Get Started For Free” button near the top of the page. Follow Populr.me on Twitter via @Populrme.

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Drew Bourke
Starmaker PR Group
615-440-9916
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