Physicians and Dentists Unite on Behalf of Children

In conjunction with the newly appointed Chicago AAPMD Day on March 9 and National Sleep Awareness Week on March 3-9, the AAPMD organization will be hosting a free screening and awareness event for children and adults on March 8 at Loyola University with the help of SleepTest.com.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend
American Association of Physiological Medicine & Dentistry

American Association of Physiological Medicine & Dentistry

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) February 20, 2013

In light of National Sleep Awareness week on March 3-9, the American Association of Physiological Medicine and Dentistry (AAPMD) will be hosting a free screening and awareness event for children and adults. It is the second event in a national series. The event will take place on March 8 from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. at Loyola University - Kasbeer Hall and will be open to the public and the press. Loyola University is located at 25 E. Pearson St. in Chicago.

“A child's compromised airway function is often overlooked by parents and healthcare practitioners. However, study after study has indicated that the airway is critical to a child's overall health, breathing and brain development. Providing this information to the public may help parents answer questions that they are having with developmental issues for their child”, Dr. John Kelly, D.D.S., AAPMD board member.

During the screening and awareness event, people will learn how certain signs in a child demonstrate unhealthy breathing. More importantly, the public will be able to learn how unhealthy breathing can lead to serious impediments to brain development, including impaired attention, behavioral inhibition, and social-emotional behaviors.

In addition to the onsite screening provided by the organization, over $12,500 in free home sleep tests for adults are being donated by the organization to the first 25 qualified attendees.

“We are bringing together professionals and the public for a conversation about a topic that greatly influences child growth and development but is not often addressed by regular pediatric dental or medical practitioners,” Dr. Michael Gelb, D.D.S., Co-President or the AAPMD said. “The more we talk about it, the more awareness there will be, and the more prevention will take place in this country.”

Research has indicated that the way a child breathes at night—through the nose or mouth, quietly or snoring—can affect the way the jaw bones grow and develop, thereby predicting whether a child will have straight or crooked teeth. What an infant eats and the way it is eaten can also affect the shape of the jaws. Research has also indicated that the shape of the jaw affects the size of breathing passages. This can determine whether a child will have a lifetime of easy or labored breathing, especially at night.

In efforts to publicize the event and get the public to attend, the AAPMD is seeking the help of the media by scheduling interviews at the office of Dr. John Kelly D.D.S. in Chicago or in-studio interviews. To schedule an interview contact Monica Susoreny at 219-455-1744. To learn more about the AAPMD and the upcoming event, visit http://www.aapmd.org.
-###-

ABOUT THE AAMPD: The AAPMD has been recognized by the City the Chicago through the adoption of The American Association of Physiological Medicine and Dentistry (AAPMD) Day, on March 9. This newly articulated alliance diagnoses and intervenes with early care rather than delayed treatment. The AAPMD recognizes that the current generation of children are facing health issues like obesity, diabetes, and learning challenges. Active AAPMD practitioners have learned from pioneers who became aware of the dental/medical connection decades ago. The AAPMD recommends early orthodontic and myofuctional (tongue posture) treatments that ease breathing passages, train proper muscle movements, and aid in the growth of the jaws. Examples of treatment would include: taking care of obstructions due to improper breathing, such as swollen tonsils and adenoids, or removing physical restrictions to tongue movements.


Contact

Follow us on: Contact's Twitter