Attorney Greg Coleman Attends AMACHI Benefit Dinner

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Greg Coleman, a class action and personal injury lawyer, attended the mentor recognition benefit dinner for AMACHI, a program designed to help children whose parents have been incarcerated.

“We have a chance to truly change these children's futures and empower them to build better lives for themselves."

On January 22, 2013, attorney Greg Coleman and his wife attended the AMACHI mentor recognition benefit dinner, which was held through the Knoxville Leadership Foundation. AMACHI is a program designed to help children whose parents have been incarcerated or who could benefit from a positive role model in their lives. Mr. Coleman and his wife have been AMACHI mentors for many years and have taken an active role in improving the Knoxville community.

The Knoxville Leadership Foundation is an organization that aims to address the needs of the city and change the lives of those less fortunate. Through homes for the poor, home repair, helping non-profit groups, mentoring children, and abstinence programs, the Knoxville Leadership Foundation is actively transforming the city of Knoxville—one person at a time. The AMACHI program is just one of many programs offered through the Leadership Foundation. This year, the Colemans were proud to attend the appreciation dinner in Knoxville for AMACHI mentors, mentees, and their families. The benefit dinner is held annually as a way for mentors and their mentees to bond further with their families and show their appreciation for the AMACHI organization.

AMACHI is a community-based mentoring program for children who have parents that are incarcerated in either state or federal prisons. “AMACHI” is a Nigerian word that means, "Who knows but what God has brought us through this child." The program was developed in 2000 to provide children of prisoners with a different path, and since its inception, more than 300,000 children have been helped*. In 2009, AMACHI expanded to include all at-risk children, and in 2011, they decided to include the children of military families as well.

According to the AMACHI website, "America's most isolated and at-risk children are the estimated 7.3 million children who have one or both parents under some form of state or federal supervision. Without effective intervention, 70% of these children will likely follow their parent's path into jail or prison."

"When I heard the statistics about how many children are at risk in our own community, I knew that I had to get involved,” said Mr. Coleman. “My wife and I meet regularly with our mentees and consider them part of our family—and our home.”

According to the Knoxville Leadership Foundation's website, there are over 800 children in Knoxville with at least one parent in prison. Without intervention, these children and distressed teens are at risk for following the same path as their parents. Being an AMACHI mentor means helping these children realize that there is a better life out there for them through positive role modeling.

"My wife and I consider our work with AMACHI as an important part of our lives,” said Mr. Coleman. “We have a chance to truly change these children's futures and empower them to build better lives for themselves."

For more information on Greg Coleman Law, please visit http://www.gregcolemanlaw.com/

Sources:
*http://www.amachimentoring.org/
http://www.klf.org/index.php/programs/amachi/

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