Marlin Steel Chief Executive Testifies Before Congress on the Need for Regulatory Reform to Promote Growth in Small Business and Manufacturing

Drew Greenblatt, president of Marlin Steel Wire Products in Baltimore, testified about the need for regulatory reform today to help drive growth in small business and manufacturing before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial and Antitrust Law.

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Marlin Steel President Drew Greenblatt (second from left) preparing to testify before House Judiciary subcommittee on regulatory reform

Marlin Steel President Drew Greenblatt (second from left) preparing to testify before House Judiciary subcommittee on regulatory reform, commercial and antitrust law

The cumulative burden of regulation is the greatest threat for a business like mine. It isn’t just one regulation that could hurt my business; it is the hundreds and thousands of accumulated requirements with hidden non-compliance penalties.

Washington, D.C. (PRWEB) February 28, 2013

Drew Greenblatt, president of Marlin Steel Wire Products in Baltimore, testified today about the need for regulatory reform to help drive growth in small business and manufacturing before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial and Antitrust Law.

“Manufacturers are seeing signs of economic recovery, but we have a long way to go. Manufacturers lost 2 million jobs in the recession, and unemployment remains unacceptably high,” Mr. Greenblatt told the committee, chaired by Rep. Spencer Bachus, R-Alabama. “The cumulative burden of regulation is the greatest threat for a business like mine. It isn’t just one regulation that could hurt my business. It is the hundreds and thousands of accumulated requirements with hidden non-compliance penalties that hold back Marlin’s full potential.”

Mr. Greenblatt was also speaking as an executive board member of the National Association of Manufacturers, the nation’s largest manufacturing trade association. It represents 12,000 member companies who employ 12 million people in every industrial sector and state.

“The burden of environmental regulation falls disproportionately on manufacturers, and it is heaviest on small manufacturers because their compliance costs are often not affected by economies of scale,” Mr. Greenblatt told the panel.

A 2010 study commissioned by the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy found that manufacturers in 2008 spent on average $14,070 per employee to comply with regulations, 75 percent more than all U.S. businesses spend per employee. The study estimated that manufacturers spend $7,200 per employee to comply with environmental regulations alone. For all regulations, the cost per employee for small firms (fewer than 20 employees) was $28,316 -- more than twice the amount per employee than larger firms.

Marlin Steel, with 32 employees, manufactures material handling containers from its plant in Baltimore for a variety of industries, including automotive, aerospace, defense and health care. The company has received recognition during the past year for its growth, innovation and the quality of its products and processes, including receiving a Pioneer Metalforming Award, being named to the Inner City 100 and Inc. 5000 lists and being registered ISO 9001: 2008.

Marlin Steel Wire Products LLC is a privately held company that manufactures precision-engineered wire basket and sheet metal fabrications for medical, aerospace, military, industrial and telecommunications clients. It exports to 36 counties.


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