Microscope.com In Scientific American

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Microscope.com, an online source and authority for a wide array of microscopes, has recently been published in the highly reputable periodical Scientific American

Microscope.com

We are very pleased to have this article on microscopes included in Scientific American as hopefully, it will encourage both professional and backyard beekeepers to take a more objective approach to managing their colonies.

Microscope.com, an online source and authority for a wide array of microscopes, has recently been published in the highly reputable periodical Scientific American. The article strays from what one might usually think of when considering the uses of microscopes, and discusses their importance in the specific sector of beekeeping.

In his article, author Charles Crookenden delves into many issues that may not commonly be understood or even known. To the layperson, the idea of the necessary inspection of a bee colony for parasites may not even be a consideration; however, as Charles points out, it can help beekeepers maintain hive health. The lack of awareness does not stop with the layperson it seems, as it's later pointed out that many beekeepers simply dose their hive each spring “just in case” as opposed to first determining if the hive is indeed infected,what that infection might be and how advanced it is.

To fully grasp the importance of this aspect of beekeeping one has to read the full article (available in the Scientific American website at http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2013/02/22/bees-under-the-microscope/) but a few key takeaways are:

  • Relaxing of city ordinances over beekeeping has lead to a growth of amateur hives in urban areas of the eastern US.
  • Use of microscopes for the detection of parasites leads to far earlier detection and reduces impact on a hive.
  • Early detection of parasites leads to reduced impact of treatment (dosing) which potentially can produce parasites that are resistant to treatment.
  • Specifically mentioned is the recently developed Dino-Lite digital microscope for its flexibility in aiding amateur beekeepers to understand their hive and detect potential issues.

What's Not Said

Whether you're a beekeeper or not, what this article really points out is that there are a wide array of microscope uses and capabilities well outside the realm of what the public commonly assumes. Things that seem invisible or unforeseen more likely just require the right equipment for proper observation; people must keep an open mind and apply this notion to their work and hobbies.

To that point, when asked about the publication in Scientific American, Microscope.com owner Charles Crookenden commented, "We are very pleased to have this article on microscopes included in Scientific American as hopefully, it will encourage both professional and backyard beekeepers to take a more objective approach to managing their colonies."

About Microscope.com

Microscope.com is an internet retailer of microscopes, based in rural Virginia and sponsors a training course at the annual EAS beekeepers’ conference.

Microscope.com was founded by a teacher 15 years ago out of the necessity for both access to the products and more importantly, access to the information required to understand your needs and what microscope will fit them best.

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Charles Crookenden
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