Texas Fertility Center ‘March Dadness’ Campaign Focuses on the Odds of Beating Male Infertility

Half of all infertility cases involve male factors. Texas Fertility Center wants couples to know that male infertility is common, but treatable.

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Texas Fertility Center - Austin, TX

Texas Fertility Center

This March, we hope to add to the conversation by sharing facts and stats about male infertility so couples can increase their odds of getting pregnant.

Austin, TX (PRWEB) March 19, 2013

Anyone experiencing the frustration of infertility knows about jumping through hoops to get pregnant. This month, as the NCAA Competition known as March Madness tips off, Texas Fertility Center (TFC) raises awareness for male factor infertility with its annual ‘March Dadness’ campaign.

“Male factors account for half of all cases of infertility,” explained Dr. Kaylen Silverberg, a reproductive endocrinologist with Texas Fertility Center. “Many couples mistakenly believe that infertility is a woman’s issue, so they may not seek treatment for male factors. The good news is that male infertility is almost always treatable.”

Texas Fertility Center assists couples in their quest to overcome infertility and get pregnant. In fact, the fertility center has helped bring over 12,000 babies into the world. The TFC fertility specialists also devote time to research, advocacy and public awareness, such as the ‘March Dadness’ male infertility campaign.

Fertility specialists point to common causes of male factor infertility: certain medical conditions; hormonal issues; ejaculation and erection problems; genetic disorders; low sperm count; varicocele; and injury and obstruction in the reproductive tract.

Some causes of male infertility, if left untreated, can progress to also cause impotence or other disorders of male sexual function.

When to Seek Treatment for Male Infertility

If you have a history of certain genetic disease, such as cystic fibrosis, or previous hernia repair, testicular surgery, vasectomy or cancer treatment, don’t wait to seek treatment for male infertility. As a general rule, 12 months of unprotected sex (or six months if the female partner is over 35) should result in a pregnancy.

Fertility evaluation for men includes a conversation about family and medical history, and a semen analysis to measure the total number of sperm, sperm motility and sperm shape.

“The results give us information about sperm count and quality so that we know how to proceed with targeted fertility treatment,” Dr. Silverberg says.

Most causes of male infertility can be treated with fertility drugs, intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in-vitro fertilization (IVF). TFC refers surgical cases to Austin’s finest urologists.

“We’re huge basketball fans here at Texas Fertility Center, and we know that fellow sports fans know all of the important statistics about their favorite teams,” Dr. Silverberg says. “This March, we hope to add to the conversation by sharing facts and stats about male infertility so couples can increase their odds of getting pregnant.”

Texas Fertility Center March Dadness: Final Four Points to Remember about Male Infertility

1.    Male factor infertility is responsible for 50 percent of all cases of infertility.
2.    Other than infertility, there are usually no symptoms of an abnormal sperm count.
3.    Almost all cases of male infertility are treatable.
4.    Some causes of male infertility, if left untreated, can progress to cause other problems such as impotence.

About Texas Fertility Center
Texas Fertility Center (TFC), one of the nation’s leading full-service infertility practices, provides advanced Infertility and Reproductive Endocrinology services to patients throughout Texas, the Southwestern United States, and the Americas. Since 1980, TFC has been recognized nationally for outstanding pregnancy rates, cutting-edge laboratory procedures, and innovative research programs. For more information, please visit http://www.txfertility.com.