Specialists Examine American Retirement Crisis at Chicago’s John Marshall Law School April 15 Symposium

Attorneys, actuaries, economists, educators and financial planners will discuss the effects the Wall Street financial crisis and long-term unemployment are having on the American economy when The John Marshall Law School in Chicago presents “American Retirement Crisis: What Can Be Done?,” a day-long symposium on April 15, 2013.

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(PRWEB) March 15, 2013

Attorneys, actuaries, economists, educators and financial planners will discuss the effects the Wall Street financial crisis and long-term unemployment are having on the American economy when The John Marshall Law School in Chicago presents “American Retirement Crisis: What Can Be Done?,” a day-long symposium on April 15, 2013.

The law school’s Center for Tax Law and Employee Benefits will host the discussion as its 11th Annual Employee Benefits Symposium. The program begins at 9 a.m. and will conclude at 4:30 p.m. Moderator and keynote speaker will be Carol A. Bogosian, owner of CAB Consulting.

“This is an extremely timely topic that has government regulators, employers and employees worried as to whether retirees will have sufficient income during retirement and not outlive their savings, and whether their living standards will be eroded by investment losses,” said Professor Kathryn Kennedy, director of the Center for Tax Law and Employee Benefits.

The recently released General Accounting Office (GAO) report “Cost of the Financial Crisis – Your Retirement” documents the devastating financial toll brought on by the 2007-2009 financial crisis and its impacts on retirement savings. The report documents how the long-term unemployed have stopped saving for retirement and started drawing down their retirement savings for living expenses. The report illustrates how a hypothetical worker with $70,000 in retirement savings at age 55 will need to continue to work another 5.5 years if he or she withdrew 50 percent of the savings during a two-year period of unemployment.

The symposium topics will be:

  •     “Reforming the Second Tier of the U.S. Pension System: Tabula Rasa or Step by Step?” presented by George A. Mackenzie, editor of the Journal of Retirement and a pension consultant, and Jonathan Barry Foreman, the Alfred P. Murrah Professor of Law at the University of Oklahoma College of Law;
  •     “The Tracker Plan: A Controlled Risk Defined Contribution Retirement Program” presented by Rowland Davis, president of RMD Pension Consulting;
  •     “Dispelling the Crises of Society Security and Medicare: A Defense of Entitlement Programs” presented by Martha Holstein, co-director, and Kristen Pavle, associate director, both of the Center for Long-Term Care Reform, Health & Medicare Policy Research Group;
  •     “Addressing the Challenges Women Face in Retirement: Improving Social Security, Pensions and SSI” presented by Joan Entmacher, vice president for Family Economic Security, and Amy Matsui, senior counsel and director of Women and the Courts, both at the National Women’s Law Center;
  •     “Public Policy and Consumer Disclosure for the Immediate Annuity Market” presented by Kelli Hueler founder of Hueler Companies, and Paula Hogan (CFP and CFA) founder of Paula Hogan, a fee-only financial advisory firm;
  •     “Longevity Insurance: Strengthening Social Security for the Older Retirees” presented by John Turner, director of the Pension Policy Center.

There is a $50 fee for this program. Attorneys can earn up to six CLE credits. Registrations are being accepted through April 8 at events.jmls.edu/EBsymposium. For additional information, contact Amy Berkowitz in the Center for Tax Law and Employee Benefits at 312.987.2380.


Contact

  • Marilyn Thomas
    The John Marshall Law School
    312-427-2737 661
    Email