Hidden Hearing Responds to Claims Hearing Aids Could Stop Dementia

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Specialists in private hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing, have responded to an article by Professor David McAlpine about how hearing aids could prevent the onset of dementia.

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Deafness impacts a greater cognitive load on the brain, meaning that the brain requires more effort to do one thing and in turn compromising other things.

Professor of Auditory Neuroscience and Head of Department at University College London’s Ear Institute, Professor David McAlpine, has commented on how hearing aids could help prevent the chances of developing dementia.

A recent study of 639 people aged 60 and over by John Hopkins University in Baltimore showed that people with mild cognitive hearing loss of 25dB, which make it hard to follow a quiet conversation or a conversation in a noisy room, would score worse in cognitive tests.

In comparison, their cognitive abilities aged by the equivalent of seven years compared to people with normal hearing. Deafness impacts a greater cognitive load on the brain, meaning that the brain requires more effort to do one thing and in turn compromising other things.

A spokesperson for Hidden Hearing said:

“If anyone is noticing their hearing is not as clear as it once was book a free hearing test with Hidden Hearing in one of our 84 branches across the UK. Visit http://www.hiddenhearing.co.uk to book your hearing test today.”

With more than 40 years’ experience in treating hearing loss, Hidden Hearing is entrusted with the care of more than 100,000 people each year. The firm has 84 hearing centres across the UK, all catering for a range of needs and budgets. Specialising in hearing tests and hearing aids, the company also offer a variety of hearing aid accessories and in 2005, became the first dedicated hearing retailer to be recognised as an Investor in People

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