Hidden Hearing Respond to Research Aiming to Reduce Jet Engine Noise

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Experts in private hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing, have responded to research which is aiming to reduce to noise emissions from jet engines.

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By reducing the noise emitted from these engines, hopefully they can reduce the number of associated hearing problems.

Virginia Tech College of Engineering, along with several US based research teams is working to reduce the noise emitted by jet engines.

The three year project for the US office of naval research hot jet noise reduction programme is part of a broader navy initiative known as ‘Noise Induced Hearing Loss Programme’.

The research is aiming to reduce noise exposure on the flight deck and its impact on nearby communities. The issue has created the problem of hearing loss and damage among military personnel, and the navy estimates jet noise from tactical aircraft can reach sounds of 150dB on flight lines.

A spokesperson from Hidden Hearing said:

“Jet engines are one of the loudest sounds we are exposed to, and for military personnel and airport workers who work with this level of sound day in and day out, the long term effects can be detrimental despite hearing protection. By reducing the noise emitted from these engines, hopefully they can reduce the number of associated hearing problems.”

With more than 40 years’ experience in treating hearing loss, Hidden Hearing is entrusted with the care of more than 100,000 people each year. The firm has 84 hearing centres across the UK, all catering for a range of needs and budgets. Specialising in hearing tests and hearing aids, the company also offer a variety of hearing aid accessories and in 2005, became the first dedicated hearing retailer to be recognised as an Investor in People.

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Vicky Moore
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