Author of Cook, Talk, Love Advises How to Avoid and Triumph Over Financial Problems Before They Lead to Divorce

Money issues are a leading cause of divorce. They don’t have to be.

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It’s OK if you messed up in the past. Take responsibility for those past decisions and make it right. By doing that your partner will recognize the courage and that will start the formation of new bonds.

Roanoke, Virginia (PRWEB) March 28, 2013

After the January 2% payroll tax increase and news that healthcare costs are due to increase 20% to 80%, personal finances are facing extreme pressure. Financial problems are already a leading cause of divorce. The stress and anguish of not being able to pay bills affects everyone in a family. Communication breaks down. Heated arguments rise from the simplest of issues. Love that once united partners becomes a distant memory. Mark Jala, author of an upcoming book promoting communication during family meals, offers tips on how to avoid, deal with and triumph over financial problems in a marriage.

“It is heartbreaking to see families in crisis. Unfortunately for many, money issues are often self-inflicted wounds. We don’t have organized finances. We rack up big credit card bills. We live on nearly 100% of our income. Whose success plan is that?” says Jala. On his blog, Cook, Talk, Love, Mr. Jala recently wrote a thorough article entitled How to Avoid and Resolve Financial Problems in Marriage. The article covers communication tips to separate financial problems from a loving relationship, and financial tips that offer a plan for the youngest of children to those embattled in financial misery. See the article here.

Serious financial problems are often described as a heavy weight, like a cinder block, on one’s chest. The pressure is intense and steady. It makes it hard to breathe. Phone calls are left to voice mail in fear the caller is a debt collector. Grocery shopping is limited to discount brands and nearly expired items. Purchases used to make us feel good like makeup, shoes, clothing and going out to eat are reduced if not eliminated. The decisions made while in a financial crisis are not by choice but by necessity. The key is to not be in that position in the first place.

Mr. Jala offers several tips in the Cook, Talk, Love article. For the children just starting to learn about money to couples starting a marriage, Jala offers these important tips. “Immediately go to your bookstore or visit your favorite online bookseller and pick up the book by George Clason called The Richest Man in Babylon. It lays out a financial success plan that nearly assures you never have to suffer through financial difficulties. I wish I learned this plan earlier in my life. In a nutshell establish a fixed percentage of net take home pay, for example 70%, and live off that that percentage. It’s simple and basic common sense. Second, for the remaining amount, for example 30%, divide that sum up for savings, charity, and retirement.”

For those already suffering a financial crisis, Mr. Jala says that “you have to dedicate a specific time to discuss finances. Don’t surprise your partner with an attack about money. Agree to a set time and leave all other time to live, talk, eat, and nurture one another. When that time to talk arrives, set financial goals and work a plan to achieve the goals. Remember a marriage is a team and it takes teamwork to make it happy and successful.” Mr. Jala also offers this tip: “Organize your finances. Put all your bills into folders and know exactly what is coming in and what is going out. Make a budget. Decide what expenses can be cut. When in a financial mess luxuries need to go. That cable football package is a luxury. Getting nails done professionally is a luxury.”

Lastly, Mr. Jala emphasizes the importance of personal responsibility. Partners like to be with someone who is responsible. Whether starting out or in a financial crisis, focus on being responsible and making responsible decisions. “It’s OK if you messed up in the past. Take responsibility for those past decisions and make it right. By doing that your partner will recognize the courage in being responsible and that will start the formation of new bonds and a rebuilding of your marriage,” says Mr. Jala.

Mark Jala is available for interviews and speaking engagements. Book him for your show today. He is available on short notice via telephone. Mark Jala writes for http://www.CookTalkLove.com and is writing his first book about using the family meal as the perfect setting for constructive family communication. Sponsors please contact Mr. Jala by email or phone for full details.


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