Nineties Popstar Carnie Wilson Announces She’s Suffering From Facial Paralysis Condition Bell’s Palsy

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Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and Director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills discusses Bell’s palsy and the best treatments for overcoming the condition.

Dr Babak Azizzadeh MD

Botox for Bell’s palsy is a great option for individuals who aren’t quite ready to undergo a surgical approach. In Carnie’s case, I’m certain that Botox could help improve her facial symmetry while she waits for the disorder to run its course.

According to a recent article by Mail Online, Carnie Wilson announced that she’s suffering from Bell’s palsy, which is usually a temporary form of facial paralysis believed to be caused by a virus bringing inflammation to the facial nerve. Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and expert facial paralysissurgeon in Beverly Hills says the condition is temporary for most sufferers.

“In 90% of cases, individuals who suffer from Bell’s palsy regain facial movement over the course of the next several months after receiving a diagnosis,” said world-renowned facial paralysis surgeon Dr. Azizzadeh. "Those who suffer from permanent or long term Bell'a palsy may be excellent candidates to undergo surgical management including customized facelifts, masseteric to facialnerve grafts, or blepharoplasty."

Bell’s palsy is a form of facial paralysis that causes individuals to lose movement in one side of their face. Though the roots of the disorder aren’t fully understood by researchers and experts, it is believed to be tied to a re-activation of the herpes virus, leading to inflammation of the facial nerve and cutting off neural input to the muscles in the affected side of the face. Surprisingly enough, it’s estimated that one out of every sixty-five people will suffer from the condition at some point during their lifetime. The popular singer, who is best known for her part in the trio Wilson Phillips, is currently undergoing acupuncture therapy to help overcome the condition.

“Acupuncture has not been medically proven to be effective in the treatment of Bell’s palsy or facial paralysis yet,” said Dr. Azizzadeh. “It does have positive health effects on the body, however when I treat individuals suffering from the condition I like to select a treatment that I’m sure can bring positive results. Additionally, neuromuscular retraining with an expert has been proven to better the outcomes of Bell's palsy tremendously as well as cross facial nerve grafts or a procedure known as gracilis free flap surgery.”

At the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, Dr. Azizzadeh believes that one of the best treatments for helping individuals overcome temporary Bell’s palsy is Botox therapy. Using the popular cosmetic treatment, Dr. Azizzadeh carefully injects the toxin into the paralyzed side of the face, lessening the downward pull often associated with the cheeks and smile. Botox works to relieve the paralyzed muscles, causing them to drift upward and improve facial symmetry. Botox also helps to calm involuntary facial muscle twitches called synkinesis often experienced as a part of Bell’s palsy.

“Botox for Bell’s palsy is a great option for individuals who aren’t quite ready to undergo a surgical approach. In Carnie’s case, I’m certain that Botox could help improve her facial symmetry while she waits for the disorder to run its course,” said Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS.

Since his extensive and prestigious training at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Azizzadeh has helped hundreds of people with varying degrees of facial paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh is the director of theFacial Paralysis Institute and one of the leading figures in the field of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh has been recognized for his work on several occasions and has appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show as well as countless other media outlets. As a trained facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon and head and neck surgeon, Dr. Azizzadeh has a distinctive insight into facial nerve function and facial aesthetics.

For additional information regarding Dr. Azizzadeh or the Facial Paralysis Institute in Los Angeles, please call (310) 657-2203 or visit http://www.facialparalysisinstitute.com.

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