Mabel Smith Cordier To Celebrate Her 110 Birthday on April 12th

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Collingswood Manor resident Mabel Smith Cordier turns 110 years old on April 12, 2013 and becomes a super-centenarian. Super-centenarians, people who reach 110 years or more, are only about one in 7 million people around the world.

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Mabel enjoyed a reputation as a fabulous seamstress, constructing clothing, drapes, quilts and crafts.

Collingswood Manor resident Mabel Smith Cordier turns 110 years old on April 12, 2013 and becomes a super-centenarian. Super-centenarians, people who reach 110 years or more, are only about one in 7 million people around the world.

In developed countries, the prevalence of centenarians is about one person in 6,000. Super-centenarians, people who reach 110 years or more, are much rarer—only about one in 7 million people around the world live this long. Mabel Elizabeth Smith Cordier of Collingswood, New Jersey, born April 12, 1903, is one of those rare individuals.

Needless to say, Mabel has experienced a lot of history. She and her two older brothers walked to and from a one-room schoolhouse in which they were educated. They and their parents, George and Cora Smith, lived in Philadelphia. Her family’s social life revolved around their church and family.

In 1920, after graduating high school, Mabel married Lee Garfield Cordier. Lee, a pharmaceutical chemist and teacher at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, (now University of the Sciences) also coached tennis and basketball. Their home in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania had a tennis court in the backyard. One of their three sons, Ray, even competed in the Davis Cup Tennis Tournament.

In keeping with societal tradition, Mabel stayed home and raised the couple’s three children, Lee, Ray and Reid. Plenty of activity occupied her days. Her granddaughter, Kim Cordier Burgo recalls, “Mabel enjoyed a reputation as a fabulous seamstress, constructing clothing, drapes, quilts and crafts.”
Following her childhood religious training, Mabel and her family participated in church activities including plays, chorus, prayer meetings, and Sunday school. Her faith has always been very important to her.

After her husband passed away in 1960, she moved into the Collingswood household of her son, Ray, and his wife. She helped raise their four children, enabling her daughter-in-law to work as a teacher at Collingswood High School.

She formed strong bonds with these grandchildren, enduring even to today. Another family tradition lives on: Mabel and Lee’s son, Ray, worked as a pharmacist during his lifetime and now Mabel’s granddaughter enjoys the same career.

Mabel never drove an automobile—in fact she walked almost everywhere she needed to go. When responsibilities waned at home, she worked at the family pharmacy in Delanco, movie house and department store candy counter. Mabel loves candy, especially chocolate, which she eats almost every day.

She moved to Collingswood Manor in 2000 where family members visit regularly. They are celebrating her 110th birthday this month. Collingswood Manor is owned and operated by United Methodist Homes of New Jersey, a not-for-profit organization guided by a volunteer board of directors affiliated in ministry with the Greater New Jersey Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.

The mission of the United Methodist Homes is to provide quality and caring services to senior men and women in a Christian community. With over 105 years of continuous operation, the organization has grown to ten communities offering independent, residential, assisted-living, skilled nursing, short-term rehabilitation, memory support, respite, and hospice to persons of all faith backgrounds. For additional information about Collingswood Manor call Barbara Wrzeszcz at 865-854-3441 or visit http://www.umh-nj.org

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Jan Carrato
The United Methodist Homes Of New Jersey
732-922-9802 2124
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