New Research in Nerve Regeneration of Fruit Flies Leads to Promising Developments in Humans

Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and Director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills comments on recent findings suggesting potential advances in neurological medicine.

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Dr Babak Azizzadeh MD

I’m a huge advocate of neuromuscular retraining and therapy after I treat my patients who have experienced problems with their facial nerve. Through this, their able to relearn certain facial movements and lead an improved quality of life.

Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) April 17, 2013

In a revolutionary new study from the University of Nevada, Reno, genetic research with fruit flies lead a team of scientists to obtain a new mechanism involving cell-death machinery that could potentially lead to several beneficial advances in neurological medicine. Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and Director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills explains the advantages he sees in the new occurrence.

“Even though more testing needs to be completed, this is a major development for any doctor treating individuals suffering from nerve injuries. The new research provided by the University of Nevada could very well lead to better treatment for my patients at the Facial Paralysis Institute,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

The study used fruit flies to examine neuron activity and cell death, and eventually led them to discover cell-death machinery is an integral part in growing nerves and is extremely important in the navigation mechanism. Scientists began studying fruit fly genetics to gain a better understanding of how axons are able to navigate long distances during development. In conclusion to the study, the researchers have reason to believe that through therapeutic events, it may be possible to stimulate neurons or sprout new neural connections following trauma or injury.

“I’m a huge advocate of neuromuscular retraining and therapy after I treat my patients who have experienced problems with their facial nerve. Through this, their able to relearn certain facial movements and lead an improved quality of life,” said Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS.

At the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, world-renowned facial paralysis surgeon Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, currently treats facial nerve injuries resulting in facial paralysis with a number of successful surgical and non-invasive treatments. Most recently, the effectiveness of such procedures including the masseter-facial nerve transfer and cross-facial nerve graft have been providing patients with facial reanimation and improved symmetry.

“My patients suffering from facial paralysis receive the best treatments available at the Facial Paralysis Institute. The masseter-nerve transfer, the cross-facial nerve graft, and the gracilis neuromuscular transfer involve regaining neural input through different nerves that can provide similar facial function,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Since his extensive and prestigious training at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Azizzadeh has helped hundreds of people with varying degrees of facial paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh is the director of the Facial Paralysis Institute and one of the leading figures in the field of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh has been recognized for his work on several occasions, and has appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show and countless other media outlets. Trained in Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery as well as Head & Neck Surgery, Dr. Azizzadeh has a distinctive insight into facial nerve function and facial aesthetics.

For more information or to speak with Dr. Azizzadeh in greater depth, please contact the Facial Paralysis Institute by calling (310) 657-2203 or by visiting http://www.facialparalysisinstitute.com.


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