Yourwellness Magazine Investigates Outcome of Smoking Ban

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Following the announcement that the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil will be tobacco-free, Yourwellness Magazine investigated the health outcomes of smoking bans.

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This decision will mean a healthier environment for athletes, staff, and soccer fans from Brazil and around the world.

According to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Regional Office for the Americas of the World Health Organization (WHO), the announcement that the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil will be tobacco-free is a welcome strategy. PAHO Director Dr. Carissa F. Etienne commented, “This decision will mean a healthier environment for athletes, staff, and soccer fans from Brazil and around the world. It also means that one of the world’s most important sporting events will not be a venue for promoting tobacco use. We commend FIFA for its concern about the health of soccer fans everywhere.”

Adriana Blanco, PAHO/WHO’s top tobacco control advisor, added, “Besides a smoke-free environment, a tobacco-free World Cup means the tobacco industry cannot use its deceptive marketing tactics to recruit new smokers among the thousands of young fans who attend the games. It supports the trend of tobacco-free mega-events and helps advance social change toward rejection of tobacco.”

With this in mind, Yourwellness Magazine took a closer look at smoking bans, and how the relatively recent ban of public smoking has impacted health in the UK. The article reported, “Even if the smoking ban was not going to be effective in stopping people actually smoking, it was still going to be a major factor in reducing the amount of second-hand smoke that other people were forced to inhale.”

According to Yourwellness Magazine, a new study has found the smoking ban did actually have tangible benefits to the health of the general public. The research revealed that, since the law was introduced in July 2007, there was a 12.3% fall in hospital admissions due to child asthma symptoms in the first year, and admissions have continued to fall in subsequent years. This indicates that fewer children are falling prey to second hand smoke. Yourwellness Magazine noted that, before the smoking ban, hospital admissions for children suffering an asthma attack were increasing by 2.2% every year.

For more information, visit the gateway to living well at http://www.yourwellness.com.

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Sabrina Lal
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