Dr. Atul Madan Reviews Studies and Cautions Patients on the After-Effects of Lap Band Surgery

Some patients have real difficulty with the after-effects of weight loss surgery, which can be more than just dropping pounds. Dr. Atul Madan reviews personal stories and a medical study on the benefits of exercise, for those who have already had weight loss surgery such as LAP-BAND®.

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Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) April 15, 2013

Some patients have real difficulty with the after-effects of weight loss surgery, which can be more than just dropping pounds. Dr. Atul Madan reviews personal stories and a medical study on the benefits of exercise, for those who have already had weight loss surgery such as LAP-BAND®.

Jen Larsen, a successful weight loss patient, found that losing weight via surgery wasn't quite the Cinderella story that she had hoped. As described in the Daily Mail, the author of Stranger Here: How Weight Loss Surgery Transformed My Body and Messed with My Head had thought that weight loss surgery would be the answer to most (or all) of her personal problems. Instead, she found that they followed her after the surgery. Some patients do struggle with the after-effects of lap band surgery, says bariatric surgeon Dr. Madan, and depression can be a real danger for those not prepared to deal with how weight loss will affect them. However, a new study by the University of Pittsburgh may help successful weight loss patients to deal with some after-effects.

Dr. Madan has warned patients that weight loss surgery such as lap band is not a quick fix, though often medically important to overall health. Not all patients understand this until after surgery. Jen Larsen is not the only candidate to find that her mental fantasy of “thin equals beautiful, thin equals a life worth living” does not match up to life after incision. Especially, she said, because weight loss surgery “allows you to completely ignore the things that the doctors tell you to do”, such as engaging in exercise, eating well, and staying away from tobacco and alcohol.

An October article in WebMD pointed out that addictions can escalate post-surgery, as patients find that a new relationship with food must be forged. A doctor of psychology, Alexis Conason, said along with his fellow researchers that this did not happen in every case of laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery under review. In a “minority of patients”, he said, “some patients who seek out bariatric surgery have a history of using food to deal with emotions”.

Conason later indicated that some people feel a great release of depression after losing the weight, but others can struggle with the new person in the mirror. When food can no longer be used as a stress reliever or therapy, it's possible that “addiction replacement” can lead to issues with addictive substances. A medical director at the UCLA Health System in Los Angeles, said that this medical issue is not more common in weight loss surgery than in other fields.

Dr. Madan says that Jen Larsen's case, and the New York Obesity Research Center study covered in WebMD, indicates the pros and cons of lap band surgery. However, he says, another study sheds light on something that might have helped Larsen: exercise. A University of Pittsburgh study has just come out, indicating that even a slight amount of exercise can help combat depression and other side effects. While traditional treatment methods have focused on counseling and anti-depressant medications, this study indicates that over 90% of patients can keep doctor visits away just by engaging in physical activity. For less than half of the recommended 10,000 steps per day, more than 80% of the 850 post-surgery bariatric patients were able to report reduced amounts of treatment for depression and anxiety.

Dr. Madan has written 175 articles, and was the first in Memphis to perform a laparoscopic gastric bypass. To date, he has performed over, and was first to offer an incision-less treatment for post-operative weight gain. As the former Chief of Laparoendoscopic and Bariatric Surgery Division at the University of Miami, Dr. Madan may well be considered an expert in his field. Dr. Madan won the 2007 SAGES Young Investigator Award, was honored by the American Medical Association Physican's Recognition Award, among others. Dr. Madan's patient reviews are consistently high, and he received the 2011 and 2012 Patients' Choice Award.

For more information on Dr. Madan or the Lap Band procedure, call 1-800-472-4900, or review more on Dr. Madan on http://www.obesityhelp.com/profiles/bariatric-surgeon/dr-atul-madan/.


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