Highly Acclaimed Facial Paralysis Surgeon Discusses Facial Paralysis Caused By Ramsay HuntSyndrome In New Article

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Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, stresses importance of seeking medical attention for facial paralysis caused by Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

Dr Babak Azizzadeh MD

Though most individuals suffering from Ramsay Hunt Syndrome do not experience long standing facial paralysis, a small number of patients do. When this happens, I often recommend a series of Botox injections to the affected muscles.

In a recent article published by Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, facial paralysis caused by Ramsay Hunt Syndrome is profiled. In the article, Dr. Azizzadeh explains how the condition can present facial paralysis much like Bell’s palsy as a symptom, which can require the knowledge of an experienced facial paralysis surgeon to treat and overcome should the condition not improve with steroids and initial medications.

“Individuals suffering from Ramsay Hunt Syndrome sometimes develop temporary facial paralysis similar to Bell’s palsy. How quickly the condition goes away is very dependent on how soon the patient is able to seek treatment. If an individual believes they may be suffering from Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, it’s very crucial to visit a doctor right away,” said Babak Azizzadeh, world-renowned facial paralysis surgeon.

Ramsay Hunt Syndrome is a condition similar to shingles and the chicken pox, though unlike the two, the facial nerve can become infected and swell resulting in temporary facial paralysis. Most often, the condition begins with a blister like rash near the ear. Successful treatment for the virus relies heavily on the patient seeking immediate medical attention to combat the infection right away. Should an infected person wait too long, facial paralysis can become long lasting or permanent.

At the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, Dr. Azizzadeh works to improve facial symmetry in patients suffering from all forms of facial paralysis through several non-invasive and surgical methods. Because most cases of facial paralysis caused by Ramsay Hunt will ultimately get better, patients often turn to non-invasive Botox as a treatment to correct partial face sagging and uneven features.

“Though most individuals suffering from Ramsay Hunt Syndrome do not experience long standing facial paralysis, a small number of patients do. When this happens, I often recommend a series of Botox injections to the affected muscles. This helps the paralyzed muscles to relax, lessening the pull effect on the affected side of the face,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS is the Director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills. Dr. Azizzadeh is Harvard-trained and board-certified by both the American Board of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery and the American Board of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Due to his vast expertise in cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, he is one of the most sought-after surgeons in the United States. Dr. Azizzadeh graduated from the UCLA School of Medicine with high honors, and continued his training by completing a six-year residency program in Head and Neck Surgery / Facial Plastic Surgery at UCLA Medical Center.

For additional information regarding the top cosmetic procedures for men in 2012, or if you have other questions for Dr. Azizzadeh, please visit http://www.facialparalysisinstitute.com or call 310-657-2203.

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