Fukushima Nuclear Plant Suffers Contaminated Water Leak

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NRG Expert, the energy market research company, has continued to track the ongoing challenges facing Japan in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami and resulting nuclear meltdown. New evidence of a contaminated water leak may mean further difficulty and knock-on effects for other Japanese industries and policy worldwide.

NRG Expert, the energy market research company, has continued to track the ongoing challenges facing Japan in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami and resulting nuclear meltdown. New evidence of a contaminated water leak may mean further difficulty and knock-on effects for other Japanese industries and policy worldwide.

The latest of a series of radioactive water leaks occurred Thursday, April 11, 2013 at the Fukushima Nuclear Facility. It has been reported that an additional 22 liters had leaked while technicians attempted to move water from another reservoir that was already leaking. [1] This, after it was announced that over 120 tons of contaminated water had already been spilt. [1] These events have caused considerable concern that the plant may not be able to remain intact for the entirety of the 40-year decommission timeline. [2]

Local fishermen were particularly dismayed as previous leaks, including one earlier this month, had severely limited the species they are permitted to harvest. [3] Many have voiced concerns that their industry may not be able to recover if incidents like this continue to occur. The IAEA has dispatched experts to review the progress of the plant’s decommissioning on the request of the Japanese government. [4]

There is considerable concern that problems may continue to plague that Fukushima decommissioning efforts. If this is the case then the direct effects on Japanese industry may not be the only cause for concern – fear of nuclear energy may complicate future projects and impact national energy policy in Japan and elsewhere.

“Japan is heavily reliant on natural gas at present and will face a looming energy shortfall if part of the country’s nuclear capacity doesn’t come on-line again soon,” says Max Krangle of NRG Expert. “With the peak summer months around the corner, increased pressure to provide reliable power means the energy suppliers should be cautious not to cut corners.”

Sources:
[1] 2 3 4 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-22079370

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Edgar van der Meer
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