Growth in Medical Payments per Claim in Pennsylvania Slowed in 2010 Due to Prices and Utilization of Nonhospital Services, Says New WCRI Study

The cost drivers of medical care in the Pennsylvania workers’ compensation system, the impact of legislative and regulatory changes on medical costs, and trends in payments, prices and utilization of medical care for injured workers are examined in the Workers Compensation Research Institute's (WCRI) new study - CompScope™ Medical Benchmarks for Pennsylvania, 13th Edition.

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Relatively small changes in utilization per claim and prices paid for professional services of nonhospital providers contributed to the slower growth in nonhospital payments per claim in Pennsylvania.

CAMBRIDGE, MA (PRWEB) April 24, 2013

Growth in payments per claim for the medical care of injured workers under Pennsylvania’s workers’ compensation system slowed in 2010, largely as a result of slower growth in payments per claim made to nonhospital providers and utilization of their services, according to a new study by the Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI).

The WCRI study, CompScope™ Medical Benchmarks for Pennsylvania, 13th Edition, said that medical payments per claim grew 3.5 percent in 2010, slower than the 7.6 percent per year from 2005 to 2010. The study observed that payments per claim for many services billed by nonhospital providers, such as physicians, chiropractors, and physical/occupational therapists, changed little or decreased in the state.

“Relatively small changes in utilization per claim and prices paid for professional services of nonhospital providers contributed to the slower growth in nonhospital payments per claim in Pennsylvania,” said Ramona Tanabe, WCRI’s deputy director and counsel.

Compared with the other states in the 16-state WCRI study, Pennsylvania had typical medical payments per claim, reflecting a combination of lower prices paid for professional services and hospital outpatient services and higher utilization of medical services.

The study observed that a greater percentage of Pennsylvania workers received at least one service in a hospital outpatient setting compared to workers in other study states. Despite the higher percentage of services billed by hospital providers, Pennsylvania had 31 percent lower-than-typical hospital outpatient payments per claim.

Rapid growth in hospital inpatient payments per episode was a cost driver in the state during the study period. From 2005 to 2010, hospital inpatient payments per episode grew 10 percent per year in Pennsylvania, compared to 6 percent per year in the typical study state.

Utilization of physical medicine was among the highest of all study states, in contrast to many components of medical payments in Pennsylvania that were lower than, or typical of, the 16-state median.

For more information about this report or how to purchase it, click on the following link: http://www.wcrinet.org/result/csmed13_PA_result.html.

ABOUT WCRI:

The Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) is an independent, not-for-profit research organization based in Cambridge, MA. Founded in 1983, the WCRI is recognized as a leader in providing high-quality, credible, and objective information about public policy issues involving workers' compensation systems. WCRI's diverse membership includes employers; insurers; governmental entities; managed care companies; health care providers; insurance regulators; state labor organizations; and state administrative agencies in the U.S., Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. For more information, visit: http://www.wcrinet.org.


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