Study examines causes of rare urinary tract lesions in children

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The journal Pediatric and Developmental Pathology reports results of a study of 21 cases of nephrogenic adenomas in 16 pediatric patients. Researchers reviewed urinary bladder biopsies to evaluate the characteristics of these lesions in children because these conditions are more often seen in adults and their occurrence in children has not been extensively studied.

Nephrogenic adenoma exhibiting papillary (A), tubular (B), tubulocystic (C), and mixed papillary and tubulocystic (D) patterns

Nephrogenic adenoma exhibiting papillary (A), tubular (B), tubulocystic (C), and mixed papillary and tubulocystic (D) patterns

...even though nephrogenic adenomas are rare, physicians and others should keep them in mind when diagnosing papillary or polypoid lesions in the urinary tract.

Pediatric and Developmental Pathology – Renal transplantation and chronic urinary tract conditions are often associated with a rare lesion found in the bladder. These lesions, termed nephrogenic adenomas, are usually benign. They are seen more often seen in adults; therefore, their occurrence in children has not been as extensively studied.

The journal Pediatric and Developmental Pathology reports results of a study of 21 cases of nephrogenic adenomas in 16 pediatric patients. Researchers reviewed urinary bladder biopsies to evaluate the characteristics of these lesions in children.

Although these lesions are rare in children, a recurrence rate of up to 80 percent has been reported. Five of the cases in this study were recurrences from three patients.

The current study looked at patterns of these lesions in pediatric patients to better identify their form and structure. A history of urinary bladder augmentation with recurrent urinary stones and urinary tract infections was common to most patients.

These results lead the authors to recommend that, even though nephrogenic adenomas are rare, physicians and others should keep them in mind when diagnosing papillary or polypoid lesions in the urinary tract. The possibility of nephrogenic adenomas should especially be considered when the patient has had a previous surgery or experiences chronic irritation from recurrent urinary tract infections or stones.

Full text of “Nephrogenic Adenomas in Pediatric Patients: A Morphologic and Immunohistochemical Study of 21 Cases,” Pediatric and Developmental Pathology, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2013, is available at http://www.pedpath.org/doi/full/10.2350/12-10-1261-OA.1

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About Pediatric and Developmental Pathology
Pediatric and Developmental Pathology is the premier journal dealing with the pathology of disease from conception through adolescence. It covers the spectrum of disorders developing in-utero (including embryology, placentology, and teratology), gestational and perinatal diseases, and all diseases of childhood. For more information about the journal or society, please visit: http://www.pedpath.org

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Bridget Lamb
Allen Press, Inc.
800/627-0326 ext. 248
blamb(at)allenpress(dot)com

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