When it’s Doctors vs. Nurses, Patients Lose: Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Examine the Controversial Proposal of Giving Nurse Practitioners More Independence

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As the shortage of primary care physicians becomes increasingly influential and even dangerous, Nurse Practitioners are now stepping up to fill the void – or they would be, if state laws allowed them to. In his latest article, “The Great Healthcare Debate: Is Increased Autonomy for Nurse Practitioners the Answer to the Doctor Shortage?” attorney Richard P. Console, Jr., examines the questions that such new regulations would raise and calls for compromises that would benefit patients in every state.

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As the shortage of primary care physicians becomes increasingly influential and even dangerous, Nurse Practitioners are now stepping up to fill the void – or they would be, if state laws allowed them to

With the shortage of physicians already causing delays in patient care across the nation and set to get worse in the years to come, many states are considering changes to laws regarding restrictions on Nurse Practitioners’ scope of practice, AARP* wrote in “Nurse-Practitioners: The Answer to the Doctor Shortage?” on March 29, 2013. In some states, these highly-trained, masters’-level educated healthcare providers work almost independently, while in other states, physician supervision is required in order to write prescriptions and diagnose and treat medical conditions. The raging debate has attorney Richard P. Console, Jr., exploring the doctor shortage and the implications of giving Nurse Practitioners more autonomy. With 20 years of experience practicing personal injury law, Console has a unique perspective on the importance of patient care being both high-quality and timely.

“As the shortage of primary care physicians becomes increasingly influential and even dangerous, Nurse Practitioners are now stepping up to fill the void – or they would be, if state laws allowed them to,” Console said. “Doctors express concerns about patient safety in a healthcare environment without physicians. I don’t think Nurse Practitioners can, will, or should replace doctors, especially in the most serious cases – but I do think opportunities for compromise exist, and there will be no better time to talk about them than right now.”

Console examines the questions that such new regulations would raise in his latest article, “The Great Healthcare Debate: Is Increased Autonomy for Nurse Practitioners the Answer to the Doctor Shortage?” Console calls for compromise between physicians and Nurse Practitioners as well as increased training requirements to ensure that all patients receive the best care possible, no matter who is treating them.

Read more: http://www.consoleandhollawell.com/law-blog/the-great-healthcare-debate-is-increased-autonomy-for-nurse-practitioners-the-answer-to-the-doctor-shortage

*blog.aarp.org/2013/03/29/nurse-practitioners-the-answer-to-the-doctor-shortage/

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