DietAssist responds to report showing added sugars make up 13% of US adult calories

Share Article

According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report issued on 1st May 2013, added sugars make up 13% of American adults' calorie intake.

Help with diet

Making diets successful

It is quite simple to lose weight quickly and easily by cutting out the sugars and DietAssist teaches people how to deal with the sugar cravings effectively.

According to a report issued on 1st May 2013, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), added sugars make up 13% of American adults' calorie intake.

The data was taken from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005–2010.

According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, calories from sugars and solid fats should only make up 5 to 15% of total calories each day.

The new CDC report shows that men devour more total calories from sugar than women, though there is little difference between men and women when comparing sugar intake as a percentage of total calories consumed.

Food is the biggest source of Americans' added sugars. 67% of calories from added sugars came from food and 33% of calories from added sugars came from drinks, researchers found. Most of the added sugar calories came from foods consumed in the home.

Researchers also found that consumption of added sugars goes down with age. Added sugars made up 14.1% of calories for men aged 20 to 39, and only 10.7% of calories for men aged 60 and older. Added sugars made up 14.5% of calories for women aged 20 to 39, but only 11.2% of calories for women aged 60 and older. 

Added sugar consumption also seems to be tied to the level of income. Added sugars made up 14% of calories for men in the lowest income level in the study, compared with 11% of calories for men with the highest income. For women, added sugars made up 15% of calories for those in the lowest income, compared with 11% of calories for those in the highest income.

This new research contradicts previous research showing that fizzy drinks were the ‘villain’ when it came to added sugars. This research shows that, in America at least, people get twice as much added sugar from food than drink.

Paul Howard, co-creator of the DietAssist programme, said “It does not matter where the added sugar comes from, the fact is that refined sugar is the ‘villain’. It is quite simple to lose weight quickly and easily by cutting out the sugars and DietAssist teaches people how to deal with the sugar cravings effectively.”

The DietAssist programme helps people who want to lose weight, but who find dieting hard work. It teaches people how to take control of their cravings so that slimming becomes easier and more successful.

DietAssist strengthens motivation and resolve and creates the optimum psychological state for dieting, and it works alongside any weight loss programme or sensible eating plan.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Paul Howard
Follow us on
Visit website