Voices Against Brain Cancer Commends Woman on How She is Keeping Her Husband’s Memory Alive

Voices Against Brain Cancer talks about an article on WWLTV.com and praises Mona Leingang on how she keeps her husband Gary’s memory alive each year after he lost his battle with brain cancer.

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...Once awareness is spread on a grand scale, it gives researches, doctors, and scientists additional incentive to find a cure.

New York, NY (PRWEB) May 10, 2013

On May 10, Voices Against Brain Cancer, an organization dedicated to brain cancer research, commends Mona Leingang on her development of Gray Day as a way to keep her husband’s memory alive.

According to an article on WWLTV.com, Gary Leingang passed away 20 months after being diagnosed with brain cancer. Mona and Gary first learned he was sick one night while watching television. Mona says, “All of a sudden Gary said, ‘I can’t read.

Something’s wrong. I can’t read.’ Within a few minutes, he couldn't say what he wanted to say anymore. By the time we got to the hospital less than an hour later, he couldn't respond to his name.” They rushed to the emergency room where they later learned that what he was experiencing was a result of the brain cancer progressing.

Mona went on to say, “About four months before he died, he said, ‘Make something good come out of this so I don’t just have cancer and die.’” In her husband’s memory, Mona decided to have May 9th, Gary’s birthday, be proclaimed Gray Day in the Louisiana Legislature. Gray is the designated color for brain cancer. She hopes that in the future, all 50 states will observe May 9th as Gray Day. With this day would come increased awareness which she hopes will lead to fundraisers for brain cancer research on a grander scale. According to the article, brain cancer is one of the most incurable cancers out there. One in approximately 170 men and women will be diagnosed with brain cancer during their lifetime.

Michael Klipper, chairman of Voices Against Brain Cancer, an organization dedicated to brain cancer research, believes that Mona’s efforts to honor her husband’s memory are key in spreading awareness. “Anytime someone takes the initiative to do something like Gray Day, more awareness is spread. Once awareness is spread on a grand scale, it gives researches, doctors, and scientists additional incentive to find a cure.”

VABC has a wide variety of initiatives in place for brain cancer research, awareness and support. The organization’s research grants fund cutting-edge research programs that will have a monumental impact on the diagnosis and treatment of brain cancer. VABC currently funds research at several esteemed institutions such as Brookhaven National Laboratory, Cleveland Clinic, Columbia, Cornell, Duke, Harvard, John Hopkins, Memorial Sloan-Kettering and Yale, to name a few.

VABC's mission is to find a cure for brain cancer by advancing scientific research, increasing awareness within the medical community and supporting patients, their families and caregivers afflicted with this devastating disease.

For press inquiries, please contact: 5W Public Relations.


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