Hidden Hearing Responds to Research into Greater Wax Moth

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Experts in private hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing, have responded to new research which could help improve microphones on hearing aids.

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The research identifies the insect as having the sharpest hearing in the world and could help revolutionise technology.

Researchers at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow have discovered that the Greater Wax Moth is capable of hearing sound frequencies of up to 300,000 hertz, reports The Independent.

The research identifies the insect as having the sharpest hearing in the world and could help revolutionise technology. The discovery has the potential to revolutionise microphone technology in everything from mobile phones to hearing aids.

The moth’s lower hearing register of just 20hHz makes it the widest range of any animal. To put this into perspective, normal human speech is between a few hundred and 3000 Hz. A typical person’s hearing peaks at about 20kHz at around 18 and drops to 10kHz by middle age.

The researchers believe the Greater Wax Moth evolved its hearing to protect itself from its predator the bat –another animal known for impressive hearing. They believe that by understanding how the moth’s hearing works they could develop better, smaller microphones which could have huge implications for the development of microphone technology.

A spokesperson from Hidden Hearing said:

“The ability to improve microphones in hearing aids could help make them even more effective for people with hearing problems. Hearing aid technology is constantly improving and benefitting the end user.”

With more than 40 years’ experience in treating hearing loss, Hidden Hearing is entrusted with the care of more than 100,000 people each year. The firm has 84 hearing centres across the UK, all catering for a range of needs and budgets. Specialising in hearing tests and hearing aids, the company also offer a variety of hearing aid accessories and in 2005, became the first dedicated hearing retailer to be recognised as an Investor in People.

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