Corporate Spring Cleaning: Two Timeless Tips for Top Productivity

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With one month left in Q2, leading Executive Coach Sonya Shelton of Executive Leadership Consulting urges business leaders to consider a corporate spring cleaning: evaluating their business models and getting rid of pieces that don’t fit.

Sonya Shelton

Sonya Shelton

Heading into the second half of the year, now is the time for executives to take a look at how teams are performing. The best leaders are those who can in the midst of ‘business as usual’ see the big picture and move forward to best get the job done.

With one month left in Q2 2013, leading Executive Coach Sonya Shelton of Executive Leadership Consulting urges business leaders to take on corporate spring cleaning—that is, evaluating systems and processes and getting rid of things that aren’t working.

According to Shelton, the most successful business executives are those who facilitate a culture of continuous improvement and who believe there is always room for their organization to work more effectively.

“Heading into the second half of the year, now is the perfect time for executives to take a look at how teams are performing. The best leaders are those who can in the midst of ‘business as usual,’ see the big picture and move forward to best get the job done,” Shelton said. “Whether it means staying the course, making a detour or executing a new plan to achieve the vision, effective business leaders are able to measure progress and adjust accordingly to finish strong.”

To help managers and executives gain insight and with their teams make the most of the remainder of this business year, Shelton offers two timeless corporate spring cleaning tips.

1. Evaluate Regularly
Survey every aspect of your organization on a regular basis. To ensure focus, productivity, efficiency, and successful results, everything from your people to your processes to your systems to your priorities to your projects needs to be consistently evaluated.

“Think of it as giving your organization a regular check-up to ensure it is performing at an optimal level,” said Shelton. “Many executives focus solely on the most obvious—profit and loss—but that approach allows other opportunities to go unnoticed. If you need to correct the course toward achieving the vision, the sooner you have that information, the better. You are far more likely to get it faster if you consistently evaluate every aspect of your organization.”

Shelton recommends the various components and projects of an organization be objectively reviewed on a regular basis. When a project or system isn’t working, it should be modified or ended.

2. Correct and Continue
After business leaders have identified things that can be done better through evaluation, they should encourage their teams to make suggestions for improvements without judgment or blame.

“Working to consistently improve effectiveness and efficiency requires everyone to contribute. You can build a culture of continuous improvement rather than relying on a particular project or initiative to explore opportunities to improve,” said Shelton. “Success comes when everyone in the organization constantly looks for opportunities. It requires the acceptance that no process, product or person is ever perfect and all can continually evolve.”

For more tips and information about Executive Leadership Consulting please visit http://www.executiveleader.com and follow Sonya Shelton on Twitter for great leadership tips and daily inspiration @SonyaShelton.

About Executive Leadership Consulting:
Sonya Shelton, CEO and founder of Executive Leadership Consulting, is the author of the book “You’re an Executive, But Are You a Leader?” As an international speaker and consultant, she shows managers and executives how to increase their leadership effectiveness so they can boost their professional and business results.

Executive Leadership Consulting offers workshops and coaching programs designed to develop leadership capability at all levels of the organization.

Sonya designed the programs at Executive Leadership Consulting based on her more than 25 years’ experience as a leader in a variety of companies and industries, including the high-paced fields of publishing, advertising, and entertainment. She has worked as an executive coach and consultant with companies around the world from start-ups to Fortune 100 corporations, including Disney, Nestle, and Microsoft.

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