Lighting Up the Night: ARA Announces Record Sales of Its Night VISER System

ARA Announces Record Sales of Its Night VISER System

Littleton, CO (PRWEB) May 23, 2013

Whether working in an urban setting or a wilderness environment, Special Operations Forces and law enforcement need an added layer of protection at night. The advance Night Vision Security Enhancer, Night VISER, is an effective portable, rugged, rapidly deployable wireless infrared (IR) illuminator and motion sensing system to increase border and perimeter security.

Today, ARA announces that government orders for Night VISER have more than tripled over the past three years, with most systems deployed within the US Army Special Forces Groups.

ARA’s Rocky Mountain Division developed the Night VISER system nearly four years ago with the purpose of providing an early warning of potential threats to patrols with a night vision device. The drop- and weather-resistant Night VISER system requires less than one-hour of training to use and works with night vision goggles. The system is composed of four disposable nodes and a single handheld remote. The nodes are all linked to the remote via a radio frequency (RF) signal. When the motion sensor is triggered, a signal is sent indicating a breach. All devices are battery powered and easily transportable in a briefcase-sized case.

“When motion is detected, an IR illuminator comes on highlighting the threat,” explains ARA Senior Systems Development Specialist Natalie Keeney. “The node will send an RF signal to the handheld remote letting the sentry know that there has been a potential security threat. Unless the bad guy has night vision goggles on, they have no idea what just happened.”

Night VISER has three different applications; standard linked mode, standalone mode, and day time mode. In standard linked mode, the nodes create a mesh network and are capable of being used in a daisy chain fashion. For example, the nodes can be placed so the RF signal is bounced from one to the next and protects against a potential threat heading into camp. In standalone mode the nodes are set up without the RF link. In this instance the user will not use the remote and will place the nodes far away, potentially on a hill that has a passage that must lead to basecamp. In this instance the nodes act like motion lights. When motion is triggered the IR illuminator comes on illuminating the area and will turn off after 15 seconds. A guard or sentry scanning the area where the nodes were placed with night vision goggles will see IR flashes indicating a trip and that there is a potential threat coming towards them. In day time mode the nodes can be used as a standard motion sensor. The IR is turned off which conserves battery power, the RF is turned on, and the operative can be notified of simple motion detection.

Not only are the sensors disposable, replacement sensors can easily be added to a network using an existing remote control. “If a node is lost or misplaced, the user can borrow another node from someone else or purchase a replacement,” says Kenney describing the unique disposal node feature. “The user then has the ability to add the new node into the remote or to relearn the nodes into the remote and have the nodes identified in the remote in the order that best fits their application.”

Most systems have been deployed within the US Army Special Forces Groups, and there are potential future uses within the National Guard and US Border Patrol. Government orders for Night VISER have more than tripled over the past three years, and Keeney sees broader applications as well. “Commercially there is an application to the hunting world and we are working to pursue that.” This kind of temporary perimeter monitoring system could also support rail yards, warehouses, and storage lots to extend the capabilities of security personnel, particularly when extra, seasonal, or irregular shipments arrive that cannot easily be accommodated within existing secure storage.

Keeney is also very excited for the next-generation Night VISER, which will greatly expand upon the system’s current capabilities. “We will make the nodes smaller, allow the remote to monitor up to eight nodes, create a universal communication device, and software that will allow a single person to monitor multiple Night VISER systems at one time.” In future versions, the monitoring software is planned to be available as an app for Android tablets and smartphones.

For more information about the range of ARA's border, defense, and security technologies visit ARA Security Systems. For more information about this project, please contact us.


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