Dr. James Wells Rethinking Diets and Dentistry in 2013 Announcing the Better Health - Better Teeth Program in Charlotte, NC.

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Dr. James Wells, a leading dentist serving the Charlotte, NC community, announces his new "Better Health - Better Teeth Program".

Popular diets may cause tooth decay.

Do popular diets cause tooth decay?

A leading dentist serving the Charlotte, NC community is challenging traditional weigh management companies like Weight Watchers, Jenny Craig and the South Beach Diet. He believes the strong message with all these diet programs, as well as most of the popular diets on the market today, suggests frequent eating as part of their formula for shedding unwanted pounds, is problematic. He is recommending a healthy diet program called "Better Health - Better Teeth" that promotes better preventative dentistry by eating less often.

Dr. James Wells explains, “These diets require eating throughout the day to keep you from getting hungry, but this frequent eating produces a steady stream bacteria in the mouth which causes tooth decay.” He goes on to say, “I question whether humans were intended to eat and/or drink so often. Prior to our diet crazed society, meals were typically spread out through the day, giving our saliva time to neutralize decay.”

Dr. Wells wants to change how we’ve traditionally been taught to take care of our teeth and gums. He reports, “Recent studies have shown there are other factors, bedsides good oral hygiene like brushing, that define a healthy lifespan of a tooth including diet, timing and frequency of eating, and understanding the mouth’s natural healing repair process.

“We have to rethink our approach to oral health,” says Dr. Wells. “When it comes to managing a daily diet, we all know that sugar is the main culprit for tooth decay, but we also need to be concerned about diets high in carbohydrates like some fruits, juices, peanut butter, crackers and potato chips.”

Wells explains that timing is also important when it comes to oral health. After eating, the combination of bacteria and food cause the build-up of a clear, sticky substance called plaque. This bacteria feeds on the sugars in the food, turning them into acids. The acid then attacks the teeth for 20 minutes or more after eating. Plaque is one of the main causes of tooth decay and naturally builds up on teeth and gums. Over a period of time, these acids destroy tooth enamel, resulting in tooth decay.

“But the good news is time can also aid in the natural healing of our teeth,” say Dr. Wells. “If we allow time in between meals for our saliva to neutralize the acids, the saliva will actually repair the teeth.” Saliva contains important elements such as bicarbonate, calcium, and phosphate. They not only neutralize plaque acids, but also help repair early tooth damage and decay.

“The oral bacteria in our diets today has changed and not for the better,” says Dr. Wells. “When we moved from hunters and gathers to manufacturing our own foods, this caused a negative shift in the bacteria, further compromising the health of our teeth. This becomes more problematic for people who eat in more frequent intervals. They’re not giving their teeth a chance to cleanse themselves naturally."

Dr. Well has some suggestion on limiting time teeth are exposed to tooth decaying factors:

  •          avoid continuous snacking and sipping of drinks;
  • allow time between meals for saliva to neutralize acids and repair the teeth;
  • decrease frequency and contact with acidic foods and drinks;
  • avoid brushing teeth immediately after consuming acidic foods, drinks, citrus fruits and juices.

For more information on good dental hygiene and oral health, contact Dr. James Wells at http://www.southcharlottedentistry.com or call (704) 759-0908.

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Dr. James Wells

Libby Lucas
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