Greenback Expat Tax Services Explains US Expat IRS Forms

Share Article

Greenback Expat Tax Services, a leading tax preparation service for US expats, is offering a basic explanation of the US tax forms needed by expats in advance of the June 17th deadline.

News Image
US taxes for expats are more complex than a standard US tax return because expats can qualify for a number of exclusions and/or credits that people living in the US do not qualify for” said Greenback President David McKeegan.

Form 1040
Form 1040 is the US Individual Income Tax Return. The most important consideration with Form 1040 is that all income must be reported regardless of where it is earned, what currency it is earned in or whether it was taxed locally. More in depth information about Form 1040 can be found on the Greenback Expat Tax Services website.

Form 2555
Form 2555 is for reporting Foreign Earned Income Exclusion (FEIE). Qualified expats are able to exclude up to $95,100 of foreign earned income from US tax obligations for the 2012 tax year. For more specific information about the requirements of Form 2555 can be found on the Greenback Expat Tax Services website.

Form 1116
Form 1116 is the Foreign Tax Credit allows expats who pay taxes to their host country to reduce their US tax obligation. With the Foreign Tax Credit, US tax liability is reduced dollar for dollar by the amount tax paid to the host country. More information about filing the Form 1116 can be found in this Greenback Expat Tax Services article.

Form 8938
Form 8938 is the Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets. As a result of the Foreign Account Compliance Tax Act (FACTA) US expats who meet the requirements of the Physical Presence Test of the Bona Fide Residence Test must submit this form if they meet the account thresholds. Specific information about the requirements for Form 8938 can be found on the Greenback Expat Tax Services blog.

FBAR
The Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR) requires anyone with $10,000 or more in a foreign bank or financial account to report that income to the Treasury Department. The FBAR is filed separately from other expat documents and has a deadline of June 30. Detailed information about the FBAR can be found on the Greenback Expat Tax Services blog.

“US taxes for expats are more complex than a standard US tax return because expats can qualify for a number of exclusions and/or credits that people living in the US do not qualify for” said Greenback President David McKeegan. He continued, “This can save US expats thousand or hundreds of thousands of dollars in US taxes. Additionally, the IRS has a number of programs US expats can use to catch up on late tax returns such as the IRS Streamlined Process or the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Initiative.”

More About Greenback Expat Tax Services
For more information about Greenback Expat Tax Services, FATCA, FBARs, or other issues related to US expat taxes, please email Greenback Expat Tax Services at info(at)greenbacktaxservices(dot)com. You can also visit us at http://www.greenbacktaxservices.com.

Greenback Expat Tax Services specializes in the preparation of US expat taxes for Americans living abroad. Greenback offers straightforward pricing, a simple, hassle-free process, and CPAs and EAs who have extensive experience in the field of expat tax preparation. For more information, please visit [ http://www.greenbacktaxservices.com.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Danielle Buglino
Follow us on
Visit website