EDI Weekly Reports on New Lab Designed to Manage Fracking Problems; Scotland Does “the Wave” with Oyster Power

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An Electronic Giant’s big investment in unconventional resources is already paying off for the energy giant, and it believes it can do for fracking what it did for aviation, reports EDI Weekly.

Oil gas, automotive, green, industry magazine online.

Engineered Design Insider, EDI Weekly Magazine, home page profile the best of oil & gas, automative, aerospace and industry news for last week of may 2013

Scotland is deploying the world’s largest array of Oysters, its unique wave-activated pumps for converting ocean energy to electricity.

In this week’s EDI Weekly, your digest of industry news and events, we have two very different energy stories. First, there’s the big push to make hydraulic fracturing safer and cleaner—and more profitable. In a completely different vein, Scotland is deploying the world’s largest array of Oysters, its unique wave-activated pumps for converting ocean energy to electricity. Get the news in brief at EDI Weekly.

“Electronics Manufacturer increasing its investment in fracking technology”

That investment has already exceeded $15 billion over the past decade, and an electronics manufacturing giant says it is putting more into it. A new laboratory to open in Oklahoma will study such things as water management in the oil exploration industry and how to help companies with their electricity needs in the oil and gas fields. The fracking industry has its risks, the company admits, but so did aviation many decades ago. And cars today are much cleaner that they were even ten years ago. Fracking can be managed safely, they say. Read more . . .

“Wave energy farm in Scotland to use Oysters”

The northwest coast of Scotland will soon see the deployment of up to 50 Oysters, revolutionary new wave generators. The result will be the world’s largest ocean energy site. Anchored to the seabed about 500 metres offshore, each Oyster waves back and forth on its hinge. As it does so, the pumping motion drives hydraulic pistons, which in turn force high-pressure water through an onshore turbine, generating electricity. An ingenious, cost-effective, environmentally friendly energy source, say its proponents. Read more . ..

About EDI Weekly
EDI Weekly is your digest of industry news from around the world. We cover

  •     Aerospace industry
  •     Automotive industry
  •     Green and environmental technologies industry
  •     Energy industry including oil & gas
  •     General manufacturing innovations and news

EDI Weekly is a publication of Zines Online and Daemar Inc, a service of Persona Corp.

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Derek Armstrong
Persona Corp
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