Sharon Kleyne Announces That Summer in America Is the Season for Farmer’s Markets

Locally Grown, In-Season, Foods Are More Nutritious Reports Nutrition Educator Sharon Kleyne.

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Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) May 30, 2013

Sharon Kleyne is a nutrition and health educator, radio commentator and host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, on VoiceAmerica, Apple iTunes and Green Talk Network. She is also Founder of Bio-Logic Aqua Research water and hydrotherapy research.

Sharon believes that Summer is the time to switch your diet to fresh, locally or home grown in-season foods. Local in-season foods, which tend to be more nutritious, tastier and fresher than out-of-season, nationally distributed foods, are most abundant during the summer months.

“Dark salad greens are especially nutritious,” Kleyne explained. “Salad containing spinach, arugula, kale and raw broccoli should be the centerpiece of everyone’s daily menu. We are fortunate in the United States to have farmers in every region of the country who provide local consumers with a tremendous variety of produce for our salads.”

Local summer produce may be grown in your own garden or purchased from grower’s markets, farmer’s markets, food co-ops, Whole Food Stores, Trader Joe’s and many others. Supermarkets are also excellent if you make an effort to look for foods that are in-season and locally grown. Produce that has traveled a long distance could be a little dehydrated, with some nutrient loss.

Wherever you purchase your produce, it should be eaten as quickly as possible for maximum nutrition and taste. Kleyne recommends washing and spin drying all salads prior to serving. This helps assure that the vegetables are clean and it also crisps them up.

In most regions of the country, said Kleyne, local produce is available from April, when asparagus and rhubarb dominate, through November, when Brussels sprouts, potatoes, cabbage and carrots become ready. Warmer climates have longer growing seasons. In the Northern Hemisphere, June, July, August and September produce the greatest variety and abundance of garden foods.

When asked about bagged salad, Kleyne noted that bagging enables consumers to purchase fresh greens any time of year, in-season or out. The drawback is that bagged greens have usually traveled a considerable distance and the nutrient content may be slightly affected. Bagged salad became widely available when a packaging material was invented that does not attract water condensation on its inner surface.

Regarding tomatoes, Kleyne said that tomatoes for nationwide distribution are greenhouse grown to withstand lengthy shipping journeys. They tend to be firmer, less red, less juicy and less tasty than local tomatoes. In Kleyne’s opinion, cherry tomatoes are the tastiest of the out-of-season, nationally distributed greenhouse tomatoes.

Kleyne does not oppose small amounts of chicken, fish and lean, red, unprocessed meat in the diet. Steamed vegetable are an excellent choice if not overcooked. Kleyne recommends eating vegan meals at least part of the week to help detoxify the body.


Contact

  • Mikaylah Roggasch
    Bio Logic Aqua Research-Rogue Media
    1-800-367-6478 122
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