Photo Essay About Communities In The Omo River Valley Of Ethiopia Premieres Online At Global Oneness Project Magazine

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The Global Oneness Project Magazine announced the release of their June/July issue and its featured films, essays, and notes from the field. The cover story for this issue is a photo essay by Jane Baldwin entitled “Kara Women Speak: Stories from Women," which highlights communities in the Omo River Valley of Southwestern Ethiopia.

Jane Baldwin, Kara Women Speak: Stories from Women," Omo River Valley, Ethiopia

Image from “Kara Women Speak: Stories from Women” by Jane Baldwin, now premiering online with Global Oneness Project Magazine

“Jane’s photography is a wonderful example of how the beauty of art can connect us to the heart of a humanitarian and environmental crisis,” comments Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, executive editor of Global Oneness Project Magazine.

The Global Oneness Project Magazine announced the release of their June/July issue and its featured films, essays, and notes from the field. The cover story for this issue is a photo essay by Jane Baldwin entitled “Kara Women Speak: Stories from Women.”

“Kara Women Speak: Stories from Women” distills Baldwin’s eight years of travel to the Omo River Valley to photograph and record stories from the women of the indigenous communities living in Southwestern Ethiopia. The photo essay provides an overview of life for the self-sustaining agropastoralists living in the Omo Valley, whose survival is threatened by the construction of the Gibe III mega dam and the loss of ancestral land as the government leases it out to foreign investors. These challenges are addressed in campaigns put forth by several international non-profit organizations including International Rivers, Oakland Institute, Human Rights Watch, Friends of Lake Turkana, and Survival International.

“Jane’s photography is a wonderful example of how the beauty of art can connect us to the heart of a humanitarian and environmental crisis,” comments Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, executive editor of Global Oneness Project Magazine. “Her work cuts through the clutter and connects us to our own humanity.”    

The June/July issue of Global Oneness Project Magazine also features other filmmakers, writers, photographers who use storytelling to explore the threads that connect ecology, culture and beauty. These stories include an essay about rivers by Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Hass; an article about soundscape ecology by Bernie Krause; a photo essay about indigenous people of Mixteca, Mexico by Matt Black; a report on post-colonial Yangon by Elizabeth Rush; a film by Ross Whitaker and Aiden O’Sullivan about the ancient art of turf cutting by hand that premiered at Hot Docs and is called “Home Turf"; a film by Eva Weber about reindeer handlers that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and is called “Reindeer Wrangling”; and a film portrait of a clown called “Laugh Clown Laugh” by Global Oneness Project’s founder and executive editor Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee.

The Project’s Magazine is presented by editors that have been at the forefront of producing and distributing multimedia content and video for the web since 2005. Their own films have also been shared in numerous international film festivals worldwide. The team continues to offer an offline-screening program for showing films in schools and communities and to date over 100 countries have hosted more than 5,000 screenings. The founder of the Global Oneness Project, Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, just completed an award-winning feature length documentary called "Elemental," which is playing in theaters nationwide through the summer 2013.

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Pamela Coddington

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