The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy responds to research that shows being subject to physical or sexual abuse during childhood can increase the risk of food addiction

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In a new study published in the journal Obesity, researchers found those who experienced physical or sexual abuse in childhood were nearly twice as likely to have a food addiction when compared to women who had no history of childhood abuse.

Hypnotherapy Professional Association

Paul White NCH Chairman

If they have to concentrate on not doing this or that, then the behaviour has not changed. Behavioural change should feel natural and normal.

It has long been believed that childhood abuse can affect psychological health but this research shows a link between their physical health as well.

The research, led by Susan Mason, Ph.D. at Columbia University, followed 57,321 adult subjects to discover whether food addiction is related to a history of childhood abuse.

This study examined the association between child abuse and food addiction, a measure of stress-related overeating, in 57,321 adult participants in the Nurses' Health Study II.

Researchers revealed that women with food addiction were on average 6 units of BMI heavier than women without food addiction.

They also found that severe abuse can cause 90% increase in food addiction risk.

According to this research it would appear that child abuse increases obesity risk in adulthood, but the mechanisms are unclear.

The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy see many clients for weight loss hypnotherapy that have been the subject of abuse or trauma in childhood. The mistake that many hypnotherapists make is to assume that this trauma or abuse needs to be dealt with. It is true that some clients may still have issues with past events, but in the main when it comes to weight loss it’s about changing clients’ behaviours around food and how they relate to food.

Paul White, the behavioural change specialist at the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy, and Chairman of the National Council for Hypnotherapy, said “For virtually all the clients that I see for weight loss hypnotherapy, the past isn’t the issue. Past events may have set up the in-appropriate behaviours in the first place, but it’s the behaviours they exhibit day to day that are causing the problem now.”

“Our hypnotherapy for weight loss programme concentrates on changing the client’s behaviours so they naturally act differently towards food. If they have to concentrate on not doing this or that, then the behaviour has not changed. Behavioural change should feel natural and normal.”

White continued, “By replacing negative behaviours with positive ones, clients start to see changes with eating habits and improvements in feelings of well being. They will then not only feel better about the food they consume, but also begin to feel happier.”

At the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy in Surrey they seek to change their clients’ relationship with food. The hypnotherapist will work with the client to change the way they view food, even the way they think about food, so the client eats to live, rather than lives to eat. By doing so they remove the guilt, reduce consumption and feel happier around food.

Paul White has been Chairman of the National Council for Hypnotherapy for five years. He has been a Director of The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy for 11 years. He has a special interest in weight control and problem behaviours (addictions).

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