Antimicrobial Test Laboratories Has Announced Antifungal Materials Testing Service

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Antimicrobial Test Laboratories (ATL) has announced the launch of several fungal resistance assays to complement its complete lineup of bacterial and viral tests.

Antimicrobial Test Laboratories

Running fungal resistance tests is difficult for many labs, but Antimicrobial Test Laboratories is up to the challenge. We spent several months perfecting these assays, and we believe our customers will love the result - Benjamin Tanner, Ph.D.

Antimicrobial Test Laboratories (ATL) has announced the launch of several fungal resistance assays to complement its complete lineup of bacterial and viral tests.

The launch of fungal resistance testing services is important for both companies and consumers, because materials that support fungal growth can, over time, incur major losses in strength, become unsightly, and produce foul odors.

“Our customers want to ensure the products they bring to market adhere to specifications throughout the entire duration of use,” explains Drew Sowersby, the microbiologist at Antimicrobial Test Laboratories who oversees fungal resistance testing.

The new capability will address the testing needs of companies that manufacture paints, sealants, drywall, and other materials challenged by fungal attack during use.

“Running fungal resistance tests is difficult for many labs, but Antimicrobial Test Laboratories is up to the challenge. We spent several months perfecting these assays, and we believe our customers will love the result,” said Benjamin Tanner, Ph.D., President.

The laboratory is offering a range of new fungal resistance protocols, ranging from ASTM G21 to ASTM D3273, for use with a range of industrially problematic fungi, including Aspergillus and Penicillium.

Tests range in duration from a week to 28 days. Study reports are clear and concise, often with high-resolution photographs.

A material's resistance to fungal attack can be measured in two different ways; either by limiting growth or in optimum-growth conditions. Under both testing paradigms, fungal spores are deposited onto the surface or embedded within a test material, then incubated for extended periods. In the optimum-growth model, fungal spores have a food source.

"Fundamentally, inoculating samples with fungi in an environment where all nutritional requirements are present is the most formidable challenge for any antifungal product," noted Sowersby,

To help choose the proper fungal resistance testing, ATL first seeks to understand the ultimate goal of the client. The most important factors to consider are the type of material and where that material will be when in use.

“We want to know if the product will be used in an indoor or outdoor setting, if it is paper-based or plastic, and whether or not it has been formulated with an antimicrobial agent,” says Sowersby. With this information, ATL can suggest the appropriate test and provide proper controls to ensure fast turnaround times and reliable study outcomes.

ATL now tests fungal-resistance of materials to the following standards:

ASTM D3273-12 - Standard Test Method for Resistance to Growth of Mold on the Surface of Interior Coatings in an Environmental Chamber

ASTM D3274-09 - Evaluating Degree of Surface Disfigurement of Paint Films by Fungal or Algal Growth, or Soil and Dirt Accumulation

ASTM G21-09 - Determining Resistance of Synthetic Polymeric Materials to Fungi

ASTM D5590-00 - Determining the Resistance of Paint Films and Related Coatings to Fungal Defacement by Accelerated Four-Week Agar Plate Assay

AATCC 30-2004 - Antifungal Activity, Assessment on Textile Materials: Mildew and Rot Resistance of Textile Materials

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