Hidden Hearing Respond to Research on Flies to Improve Hearing Aid Microphones

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Experts in private hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing, have responded to research that has led to the creation of a new type of hearing aid microphone.

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The researchers studied the hearing of the Ormia Ochracea, a house-fly sized insect which is native to the southeast US and Central America.

A group of scientists at Binghamton University have developed a new type of microphone which offers a better acoustical performance than those currently available in hearing aids, reports Science Daily.

The researchers studied the hearing of the Ormia Ochracea, a house-fly sized insect which is native to the southeast US and Central America. Unlike other flies, it has eardrums that sense sound and pressure, much like human ears.

They used their knowledge of the Ormia Ochracea’s ears to design a microelectromechanical microphone with a 1mm by 3mm diaphragm that is designed to rotate about a central pivot in response to sound pressure gradients, with the motion of the diaphragm detected using optical sensors.

The scientists are due to present the results of their work at the 21st International Congress on Acoustics this week in Montreal.

A spokesperson from Hidden Hearing said:

“Scientists have been studying the ears and cells of animals for some time to understand how we can apply their hearing ability to our own. By understanding how their hearing works, scientists can hopefully apply the same principles to hearing aids and add to the effectiveness of hearing aids overall.”

With more than 40 years’ experience in treating hearing loss, Hidden Hearing is entrusted with the care of more than 100,000 people each year. The firm has 84 hearing centres across the UK, all catering for a range of needs and budgets. Specialising in hearing tests and hearing aids, the company also offer a variety of hearing aid accessories and in 2005, became the first dedicated hearing retailer to be recognised as an Investor in People.

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