PHS Teacrate pleased at 2% increase in university applications

Share Article

As new figures show that the number of people applying for university has increased over the last 12 months, Teacrate Packaging offers advice to parents and students on how to make the moving process between homes as simple as possible.

News Image
As we enter the final part of the academic year, hundreds of thousands of students and parents will need to start thinking about the practicalities of moving away from home for the first time.

As new figures show that the number of people applying for university has increased over the last 12 months, Teacrate Packaging offers advice to parents and students on how to make the moving process between homes as simple as possible.

Statistics released by UCAS last week revealed that the number of students in England applying to go to university has increased in the past year.

428,000 pupils applied to higher education institutions for admission in 2013, a 2% improvement on 2012 which saw a significant drop in admissions after the £9,000 tuition fees came into effect.

Ruth Scruton, Marketing Manager for Teacrate Packaging, part of the PHS Group, said: “It is great to see that the number of university applications has increased for 2013.

“But as we enter the final part of the academic year, hundreds of thousands of students and parents will need to start thinking about the practicalities of moving away from home for the first time.

“A good way of transporting and storing bulky possessions is student moving packs, which contain all the boxes and packing materials you need to prepare for a stress free move. They can even be folded down and stored away to be reused at the end of term.”

But it is not just school leavers who need to think about transporting their belongings. Half a million students graduating this summer are moving out of student rented accommodation over the coming months, many back into to the family home.

In fact, according to the Office for National Statistics, almost a third of men and women aged between 20 and 34 now live at home with their parents.

Ruth Scruton said: “Recent graduates often find themselves returning home after university to save money or as a stop-gap before finding their first job.

“After three years living independently, students will have accumulated many personal possessions which need to be incorporated into the family home.

Plastic storage boxes are a good option for placing belongings in long term storage, particularly books and files which do not need to be easily accessible.”

But whilst university applications show an improvement on 2012, they are still far below the 464,000 applications in 2011. Teacrate Packaging hopes to see a further application rise in 2014. Click here for more packing tips from PHS Teacrate.

  • Ends-

Notes for editors

About PHS
The PHS Group is a leading workplace services provider, and has traded in the UK since 1963. It has a diverse service portfolio aimed at improving work and leisure spaces, while making life much easier for facilities, building and people managers.

PHS really does ‘do more than you think’, providing products and services for:

  •     Crate rental and packaging
  •     Interior and exterior planting
  •     Laundry equipment and workwear
  •     Matting and flooring
  •     Records storage and management
  •     Shredding and recycling
  •     Testing and compliance
  •     Washrooms
  •     Waste management
  •     Water machines
  •     Workplace consumables

PHS provides these direct to UK companies, and also operates as a tier one supplier to the facilities management market, supporting the integrated service propositions of most of the major FMs.

The PHS Group’s annual turnover for the year ending March 2012 was £422 million. It employs around 5,000 personnel, operates from a wide network of 153 regional service branches, and takes care of over 250,000 customers at over 450,000 locations in the UK, Ireland, Holland, Belgium and Spain.

http://www.phs.co.uk/wedomorethanyouthink

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Ruth Scruton
Visit website