Rockbridge Associates to Unveil Updated Technology Readiness Index at QUIS13

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Rockbridge Associates, a full-service market research firm, is pleased to announce that its Chief Methodologist and Founder, Charles Colby, will be presenting on the “Technology Readiness Index 2.0” at the QUIS13 Conference in Karlstad, Sweden this month.

Technology Readiness 2.0 holds promise as a robust tool for future research on technology behavior in the services sector.

Rockbridge's Chief Methodologist and Founder, Charles Colby, will be presenting on “Technology Readiness Index 2.0” at the QUIS13 Conference in Karlstad, Sweden this month. This is the culmination of a joint research effort with Professor A. Parasuraman, Director of PhD Programs at the University of Miami School of Business, that has spanned 30 countries and 14 years. The presentation will introduce the latest Technology Readiness Index (2.0), discuss the research methods used to revise it (including social media discussions and confirmatory factor analysis), and provide insights about the role of technology readiness in today’s increasingly technology-based service landscape.

The Technology Readiness Index (TRI) was first published in 2000 in the Journal of Service Research and has become a widely accepted metric for studying the propensity to adopt and use cutting-edge technology at home and the workplace. As part of Rockbridge’s ongoing research on technology’s impact on consumer behavior (http://rockresearch.com/services-solutions/technology-readiness-research), the index has been updated to include new themes, such as distraction and the effects of technology on social relationships.

This latest research effort to update the Technology Readiness Index began with a qualitative phase that identified hypotheses about technology drivers and inhibitors; consumers in the U.S. discussed their views on technology in an online discussion that mirrored a social media conversation (using the innovative OpinionPond™ tool - http://rockresearch.com/services-solutions/opinionpond). The researchers mined the qualitative results and developed a comprehensive survey instrument that included existing and revised items of the original TRI. Many existing items were updated to reflect newer descriptions of technology, while new items were included to capture contemporary themes uncovered in the qualitative discussions—for instance concerns such as current-day technologies causing distraction, dependence and diminished social interaction.

A major difference from the 2000 Journal of Service Research article is that TR 2.0 goes beyond creating an index metric, and also includes a segmentation typology that can be used to categorize consumers based on combinations of motivations and inhibitions towards technology adoption and use. This segmentation was developed using Latent Class Analysis, and resulted in five groups: Explorers (highly motivated, few inhibitions), Pioneers (highly motivated but high on inhibitions as well), Skeptics (low on both motivations and inhibitions), Paranoids (high insecurity) and Laggards (low on motivations, high on inhibitions).

Technology Readiness 2.0 holds promise as a robust tool for future research on technology behavior in the services sector. In particular, the reduced attribute battery will make it more useful for providing detail on technology motivators and inhibitors without requiring a lot of space on research surveys. The scale is copyrighted by the authors, but is made available at no cost to scholars using it for academic studies.

Those interested in learning more about the Technology Readiness Index and/or Rockbridge's upcoming speaking engagement at QUIS13 should visit http://rockresearch.com/quis13 or contact Rockbridge Associates at 703-757-5213.

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Robert DeVall

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