Scambook Advises Consumers to Safeguard Their Privacy on Social Media Apps Like Snapchat

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Scambook, the Internet’s leading complaint resolution platform and consumer information site, is reminding users to exercise caution when sharing sensitive photos on social media apps such as Snapchat. While Snapchat promotes itself as a private photo-sharing app that deletes users’ photos after a few seconds, many individuals have found ways to bypass the app's deletion process and access these private photos.

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Many users have an expectation of privacy on social media which is, unfortunately, unrealistic. The 'Snapchat Leaked' trend illustrates why we shouldn't be so complacent about what we post online.

Scambook, the Internet’s leading complaint resolution platform and consumer information site, is reminding users to exercise caution when sharing sensitive photos on social media apps such as Snapchat. While Snapchat promotes itself as a private photo-sharing app that deletes users’ photos after a few seconds, many individuals have found ways to bypass the app's deletion process and access these private photos.

New third-party websites like "Snapchat Leaked" are gaining popularity as a platform for sharing users' Snapchat photos with the general public without their explicit consent. Users and privacy advocates are growing concerned by the trend, which poses a threat to users' identity and reputation.

"Many users have an expectation of privacy on social media which is, unfortunately, unrealistic. The 'Snapchat Leaked' trend illustrates why we shouldn't be so complacent about what we post online," said Kase Chong, Scambook's Director of Marketing.

"The leaked Snapchat photos range from silly and embarrassing to explicit images which could potentially cause irrevocable damage to a user's reputation, such as being fired from their job," Chong added.

To prevent any unintended breach of privacy, Scambook advises users to remember that social media profiles and apps such as Snapchat are always potentially vulnerable to cyber criminals or others who wish to violate the user's privacy. As a general rule, users should never post any content that they would like to keep truly private on the internet.

Scambook also recommends the following three rules to help increase user privacy and reduce risk of unwanted exposure on social media:

1. Never post explicit photos online or through apps like Snapchat. Users should be very careful not to send “private” explicit photos to others through apps, even if the receiving user is trustworthy. Just as with many Internet run programs, these apps have loopholes for privacy such as screen shooting sent images.

2. Users should only share personal photos with people they know and trust. If users want to sent private photos, users must make sure that the account they claim to be sending to is the alleged users’. If the name is not the same as that the user claims, this is a red flag to not send photos to this account.

3. Users should make sure photos never include personally identifying information, such as credit cards, mailing addresses or license plate numbers. No personal information should be sent through apps for any reason. This information can be found and used for identity theft.
For more information, visit http://www.scambook.com/blog

ABOUT SCAMBOOK
Scambook is an online complaint resolution platform dedicated to obtaining justice for victims of fraud with unprecedented speed and accuracy. By building communities and providing resources on the latest scams, Scambook arms consumers with the up-to-date information they need to stay on top of emerging schemes. Since its inception, Scambook has resolved over $10 million in reported consumer damages. For more information, visit scambook.com.

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Judy Dixon
PMBC Group
(310) 777-7546
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