Kathy Kolbe Speaks Out on Need for Innovators in Business

Thought leaders have been concerned about the lack of risk takers in business today. Business leaders are wondering where they went and Kathy Kolbe is working to bring some of the root causes to light.

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Kathy Kolbe

Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) June 13, 2013

Thought leaders have been concerned about the lack of risk takers in business today. Business leaders are wondering where they went. Kathy Kolbe is working to bring some of the root causes to light.

The Wall Street Journal reports the American risk-taking spirit appears to be fading, noting that Americans start fewer businesses. John Haltiwanger, a University of Maryland economist who has studied the decline in American entrepreneurship said, “The pessimistic view is we’ve lost our mojo.“ What we’ve lost is a tolerance for a particular M.O. (modus operandi/method of operation).

There has been a bias against risk takers among many educators and physicians for years. Kids who naturally initiate innovation were told they shouldn’t act that way. If they weren’t able to fight for their need to improvise, they learned to stifle their natural drive or were medicated into compliancy.

The pattern of conative instincts that leads to entrepreneurial efforts has been badly abused. Conation is the faculty of the brain that drives you to take purposeful action according to your instincts. Conative abilities are the natural, inherent and unchanging talents that, when acted on, lead to success and well-being as you use your creative energy to solve problems.

Ever increasing quantities of kids have been labeled ADD/ADHD and medicated to keep them from distracting others. This has not only robbed them of opportunities to learn to self-manage their instinctive strengths, it has kept these misidentified talents from blossoming naturally. Our culture is beginning to notice the absence of their innovative energy. We’re paying the price for the unintended consequences of dulling the minds of those who would now be leaders in changing the status quo.

So many parents are told: “Your child won’t conform to the system we have in the classroom. He’s being disruptive. We have to change the way he acts.” It is not about helping him or her use these abilities to create change in productive ways. It is an attempt to keep those behaviors from interfering with current classroom procedures. By labeling them “disabilities,” schools not only dull the uniqueness, they get extra funds for doing so.

Now these non-conformist kids’ abilities are MIA in the workplace. Now we recognize the loss of the creative disruptors. Now, just maybe, more educators (and corporate trainers) will be open to the reality that trying to make every student do things one way is not the best way to get the results both the kids and society needs.

Kolbe says, "I've never lost hope that leaders in education and medicine would realize this mistake. It’s logical that the evidence would come from the business world, where all of the natural conative strengths are essential to bottom line performance. The research I’m doing and data I’ve been collecting (with the help of enlightened educators) regarding conation and disabilities may now be recognized as relevant." With the help of these educators, Kolbe will offer it for public discourse over the coming months.

Kids whose innovative instincts have been pathologized have suffered from the lack of freedom to be themselves. In a society that says it values freedom, this loss of freedom for many of our children is unacceptable. It is embedded in our standardized testing programs and strongly influences university and corporate selection criteria. It is a national disgrace.

In order to have innovation in the workplace, we must free all kids to be who they were created to be.