5:2 Diet - Revolutionary Approach or Dangerous Fad?

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The 5:2 diet fails to address underlying eating habits leading to rebound weight gain, say DietAssist in an intermittent fasting info-graphic commissioned by high street vitamin chain, Holland & Barrett.

DietAssist is the perfect partner to 5:2 intermittent fasting

DietAssist is the perfect partner to 5:2 intermittent fasting

Like other diets, the 5:2 fasting approach doesn’t address the underlying eating habits which caused weight gain initially. As a result, weight usually piles back on when a person stops fasting.

DietAssist have questioned the long term sustainability of the 5:2 intermittent fasting diet in an info-graphic detailing the pros and cons of the 5:2 fasting diet.

The info-graphic, published on the DietAssist website yesterday, was commissioned by Holland & Barrett, the UK's leading retailer of vitamins, minerals and herbal supplements.

It presents the main arguments for and against intermittent fasting in a pictorial way, with information drawn from sources including the NHS, the US National Institute of Health, the BBC, The Daily Telegraph, Dr Michael Moseley and DietAssist.

Spokesman for DietAssist, Rob Woodgate, says, “Like other diets, the 5:2 fasting approach doesn’t address the underlying eating habits which caused weight gain initially. As a result, weight usually piles back on when a person stops fasting.”

“DietAssist addresses this issue by teaching people how to change their habits and behaviours around food, so that losing weight becomes easier, more natural and longer lasting. Our approach compliments traditional diets, such as the 5:2 diet, to make them work long term.”

Since intermittent fasting was popularised by Dr Michael Moseley in a BBC Horizon programme, the “5:2 diet” has gathered many fans worldwide.

Champions of the 5:2 diet claim that the diet can not only help people lose weight but can also increase lifespan, lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes.

Although Intermittent fasting has been studied in animals since the 1930s, it has limited human research data compared to other weight loss techniques. Some claim it causes anxiety and irritability, and that it can be dangerous for pregnant women and diabetics.

The lack of research hasn’t stopped the diet taking off, however, and Dr Michael Moseley’s website claims it is now the UK’s bestseller.

As broadcaster, Andrew Marr, found out to his cost, blindly following the latest health craze can be dangerous to health. He suffered a major stroke after an intensive session on a rowing machine after reading an article that encouraged people to "take very intensive exercise in short bursts - and that's the way to health".

The NHS website warns that information on the safety and effectiveness of the 5:2 diet is limited, and recommends checking with a GP to see if it is suitable.

The DietAssist programme is the result of over 20 years experience of helping people to lose weight effectively, and uses the latest psychological techniques to avoid the self sabotage and demotivation that dieters commonly experience.

The DietAssist programme helps dieters strengthen their motivation and resolve, and creates the optimum psychological state for success. It is designed to work alongside any weight loss programme or sensible eating plan.

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