DietAssist criticises AMA for classifying obesity as a disease

Classifying obesity as a disease is counter productive and could actually make the obesity crisis worse, says DietAssist.

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A disease is generally something you can’t do much about without medical intervention. However, this is not the case with obesity. For most people, the main problem is motivation.

London, UK (PRWEB UK) 28 June 2013

DietAssist have criticised the American Medical Association’s (AMA) move to classify obesity as a disease, saying "it is counter productive and could actually make the obesity crisis worse".

Their criticism, published today on their blog, comes in response to news that the AMA voted to classify obesity as a disease.

Even the AMA were divided, and though a committee of experts were opposed to the move, the association’s delegates voted to approve the change.

If the same happened in the UK, a third of the population would be classed as diseased at a stroke, even if they just need to lose a stone or two.

Although being overweight has been a health problem for decades, and is forecast to get a lot worse, GP’s simply don’t have the time to help patients treat and prevent obesity.

For Americans, the new designation is alarming - they went to bed feeling fine and woke up with a disease.

Declaring obesity as a disease is contentious, not least because it went against recommendations of the AMA’s own Council on Science and Public Health.

The council’s lack of enthusiasm stems in part over raising the stigma associated with being overweight, and concerns that it will push overweight people towards surgical treatment or expensive drugs.

Studies have found that more than half of obese patients have never been told by a doctor that they need to lose weight, a result of some doctors’ unwillingness to hurt patient’s feelings.

DietAssist say that the move by the AMA “is counter productive and could actually make the obesity crisis worse.”

Paul Howard, spokesman for DietAssist, says, “A disease is generally something you can’t do much about without medical intervention. However, this is not the case with obesity. For most people, the main problem is motivation to eat and drink appropriately. Once someone is motivated, they are miraculously able to lose weight.”

DietAssist say that strong motivations for change include a holiday, a special event like a wedding, a health scare or a break up of a relationship.

DietAssist believes its psychological programme can help people move from obese to normal weight in a sensible and natural way by helping them get motivated to succeed.

The DietAssist programme also helps people to lose weight by changing the thought processes that stop people from losing weight and helping them take control of their eating behaviours.

It does this by helping dieters strengthen their motivation and resolve, and creates the optimum psychological state for success. It is designed to work alongside any weight loss programme or sensible eating plan.

Julie, who used DietAssist to lose 2 stones, agrees that successful weight loss starts with the mind. She says, "I had never really thought my weight issues were about what was going on inside my head. All of a sudden, I felt in control, no longer constantly thinking about food or what I am eating next. I eat smaller portions and don’t pick."