Signal-Health Develops Easy Checklist to Identify Possible Sweating Issues in Horses

In consultation with researchers and veterinarians, Signal-Health has compiled a simple, 3-point checklist to help horse owners and trainers identify sweating problems so they may be caught early and treated promptly.

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Horse being treated with Equiwinner.

Inefficient sweating will affect horse performance.

Mesa, AZ (PRWEB) June 25, 2013

Summertime – and the livin’ is not always easy for horse owners and trainers. With the hottest temperatures of the year just around the corner, it’s more important than ever to know if a horse is sweating adequately and, if not, to correct the problem.

Like humans, horses need to sweat in order to regulate their body temperature and keep them cool. This natural cooling system not only needs to operate, it needs to operate at peak efficiency whether in temperature extremes or after the exertion of exercise or work.

When a horse doesn’t sweat at all after a workout, not even under the tack, something is seriously wrong. This condition is called anhidrosis or non-sweating. Not all sweating problems are obvious, though.

According to Signal-Health, it’s easy to miss the signs. Owners and trainers sometimes don’t notice indications of inefficient sweating. They may not know how to check for them. Or they may treat the horse for other problems such as respiratory or skin issues without realizing that inefficient sweating could well be the underlying cause of those conditions.

Left untreated, inefficient sweating can cause the horse to overheat and will affect performance immediately. It can also compromise a horse’s long-term level of health. Like heat stroke in humans, at its most severe, it can be fatal.

As a result, and in consultation with researchers and veterinarians, Signal-Health has compiled a simple, 3-point checklist to help horse owners and trainers identify sweating problems so they may be caught early and treated promptly.

1)    Take the horse’s temperature at rest, after exercise and again at intervals after exercise
This is the first thing to check because the relationship between sweat and body temperature can help determine whether or not the horse is sweating efficiently.

To take the temperature, place a lubricated thermometer into the anus and gently press it against the wall of the rectum. Then follow the thermometer instructions.

Normal temperature for a resting horse is 99.5° to 100.5° F (37.5° to 38°C). During a workout, the temperature may rise to 103.3°F (39.6°C) but should not exceed 104.9°F (40.5°C). The temperature should fall quickly when exercise has stopped. If the temperature remains elevated for too long, the horse may not be sweating properly. A rectal temperature of greater than 104.9°F (40.5°C) is serious and steps should be taken to cool the horse quickly. Keep in mind that every horse can overheat when it’s too hot and humid or conditions are unsafe to work a horse.

When in doubt about sweating, check the horse’s temperature again, especially if it has been shipped to a new climate or as the seasons change. A horse that sweats well in winter can become a non-sweater in summer.

2)    Look for signs of sweat over the horse’s entire body, even the lower legs
After a good workout, a horse should sweat everywhere, even on its lower legs. If you don’t see sweat there, the horse isn’t sweating as well as he should. If you’re not sure, exercise with horse boots or wraps so sweat can accumulate and be easier to see.

Horses in arid climates may sweat well but the evidence evaporates so quickly, it’s harder to see. After a good workout, however, a properly sweating horse in an arid climate will accumulate sweat under the tack and even under boots on the lower legs.

3)    Be alert to other conditions. They may indicate that sweating is the real problem
Labored breathing is a natural response to overheating and can be misdiagnosed as a respiratory issue or the result of poor fitness. Always check for signs of poor sweating and treat that first.

Sweat contains salts that have an antimicrobial effect on a horse’s skin. If a horse’s coat is dull or the skin is scaly, it may be because the horse isn’t sweating or is a patchy sweater so those salts aren’t being delivered to the skin to protect against microbial attack. Again, check for signs of poor sweating and treat that first.

Feeding the horse more electrolytes only treats the symptoms of inefficient sweating. To treat the root cause, the electrolytes the horse already has need to be restored to their proper, natural balance. This can be done quickly, easily and cost-effectively with a patented, non-invasive dermal patch.

This patch serves as a natural electrolyte balancing system, ensuring proper electrolyte activity which, if unbalanced, has been linked to equine anhidrosis1. Developed by ActiveSignal Ltd in the United Kingdom, and marketed under the trade name “Equiwinner”, the patch restores normal cell metabolism by stimulating communication directly between cells in the horse’s body.

Equiwinner patches are distributed in the United States and Canada by Signal-Health LLC. For more information about how they work, or to order, please visit http://www.signal-health.com or phone toll-free: 1-877-378-4946.

1. A preliminary study of the short circuit current (Isc) responses of sweat gland cells from normal and anhidrotic horses to purinergic and adrenergic agonists. Wilson, Darius C.S., et al, Veterinary Dermatology, June 2007


Contact

  • Barbara Socha
    Signal-Health LLC
    (480) 985-9515
    Email