New App Discovery Service OttoCat Categorizes all 900,000 Apps in the iTunes App Store

Share Article

Apple Touts 900,000 Apps in iTunes App Store, But in Practice Only 0.5% of Apps are Discoverable; New App Discovery Service Categorizes all 900,000 Apps

OttoCat catagorization example

"OttoCat has confronted the app discovery problem head-on, giving users an easy way to finally access the 99.5% of the App Store that’s left hidden by app search and recommendation engines."

OttoCat today announced that consumers and developers can finally access and explore all of the nearly 1 million Apps in the App Store using OttoCat’s new free App Discovery service.

Apple CEO Tim Cook recently touted the meteoric growth of the App Store at the Worldwide Developers Conference, but what he didn’t address is how difficult it is to access most of the store’s apps. According to Cook there are:

  • 900,000 apps in the App Store
  • 50 billion app downloads from the App Store
  • 6 million iOS developers were paid over $10 billion

Here’s the rub: there’s no good way to get beyond the top 0.5% of apps in the store—until now. Research shows that 70% of apps have fewer than 10 user ratings, and 30% have none at all. Although the App Store is a success for a few top developers, most independent developers create apps that remain undiscovered and unprofitable.

OttoCat has confronted the app discovery problem head-on, giving users an easy way to finally access the 99.5% of the App Store that’s left hidden by app search and recommendation engines. By giving users a path past the few most popular apps, OttoCat gives independent developers a chance to display their wares, and users a chance to see them.

App Search only works when users have a specific app or function in mind, and app recommendation engines are inherently subjective (and potentially biased), giving users more apps like the ones they already have. As a refreshing alternative, OttoCat’s new service organizes the entire store into "Deep Categories," making it easy to explore all of the apps.

OttoCat picks up where Apple’s categories leave off by extending the category structure. With Deep Categories all apps are accessible. For example: users don’t have to use keyword search to guess what might be in the Music category. They can simply click on Music and see the automatically generated subcategories under Music (Guitar, Chords, Lyrics). Clicking on Lyrics gives you further subcategories (Singing, Karaoke and Kid’s Songs).

The OttoCat Targeted Browsing Platform enables users to easily navigate the entire store and drill down to their specific area of interest, or discover entire categories of apps that they never imagined existed.

Edwin Cooper, CEO of OttoCat, said: “With our algorithms we don’t need to hand-create a Kids category. The inventory of the store is automatically organized into self-naming categories. Organize the store by hand, and you might think twice about adding a Yo Mama category. When you let the data do the talking, you get Entertainment > Humor > Joke > Yo Mama (99 apps). It's a much more interesting place to explore when you can actually see what's there.”

About OttoCat
Founded in 2012 by successful entrepreneurs Edwin Cooper (CEO) and Michelle Cooper (COO), OttoCat offers the first technology to automatically categorize the entire contents of Apple's iTunes App Store, allowing users to easily navigate and browse for apps. This new Targeted Browsing Platform automatically generates categories and subcategories, giving users an inside look at the store and opening its doors for discovery. Prior to OttoCat, Edwin Cooper founded InQuira, a knowledge management platform provider serving Fortune 500 clients including Apple, Fidelity and Honda. InQuira was acquired by Oracle in 2011. Cooper's expertise in Computational Linguistics and Information Retrieval uniquely positioned him to develop OttoCat's breakthrough proprietary technology. OttoCat is available at http://www.ottocat.com, is free to use and shows no ads. OttoCat is based in Berkeley, California.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Wynne Ahern Kokka
Follow us on
Visit website