From North Dakota to the Nation’s Capital: Artist Lauren Good Day Giago Builds a National Platform for Native Art

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Native American artist Lauren Good Day Giago incorporates culture, tradition, and community into her nationally acclaimed, award-winning art. View her work at the 2013 Santa Fe Indian Market from August 17th to 18th in downtown Santa Fe.

Artist Lauren Good Day Giago

Taught to bead by her mother and grandmother, Giago places a paramount on breaking traditional boundaries with a unique female perspective.

For artist Lauren Good Day Giago (Arikara/Hidatsa/Blackfeet/Plains Cree), each piece of original clothing, beaded regalia, and detailed ledger art that she creates tells a story of culture, tradition, and community. Taught to bead by her mother and grandmother, Giago places a paramount on breaking traditional boundaries with a unique female perspective. Her artistic stories emphasize the strength and legacy of Native women and culture. These eye-opening ideological and aesthetic frameworks have landed her work in prestigious collections, such as the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, the Heard Museum, and the Buffalo Bill Cody Museum. She also shows her art in juried Native art shows across the country. In 2012, she won second place in the Ledger Art Division at the Santa Fe Indian Market, a tremendous honor for a young artist.

Originally from North Dakota, Giago moved to Santa Fe two years ago to study Indigenous Liberal Studies at the Institute of American Indian Arts. This program, which emphasizes the importance of maintaining Native communities and traditions, has been essential to her creative process. As she documents and creates, she cultivates a relationship between her work and the traditions and skills of those who came before her. Giago plans to use her studies to educate both Native and non-Native communities on the importance of upholding intergenerational teachings and storytelling.

One of Giago’s pieces, a traditional dress she made in tribute to her grandfather, Blue Bird, exemplifies her passion for honoring her ancestors and culture. Purchased by the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indians, the piece tells the story of her grandfather’s journey as a warrior in the Stone Hammer Society and his service in Vietnam through intricate imagery and beadwork. The dress, like much of her artwork, serves as a vessel for sharing stories and preserving history in a non-traditional format. Her artistic mastery and dedication show through each piece of her art – and have garnered her extensive praise and awards.

Lauren Good Day Giago will show her work at the 2013 Santa Fe Indian Market. For more information on her artwork, click here. For more information about SWAIA and the Santa Fe Indian Market, visit http://www.santafeindianmarket.com.

About SWAIA

SWAIA is an advocate for Native American arts and cultures and creates economic and cultural opportunities for Native American artists by producing and promoting Santa Fe Indian Market Week™, the finest Native American art and cultural event in the world; cultivating excellence and innovation across traditional and non-traditional art forms; and developing programs and events that support, promote, and honor Native artists year-round.

SWAIA is a non-profit organization, and keeps no portion of the sales made by artists during Santa Fe Indian Market Week™.

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Tailinh Agoyo
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