Does the cutlery we use make any difference to our thought processes about food, asks the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy

In a weight loss report released this week, The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy highlights new research showing that the flavour of food is affected by the weight, size, shape, and even the colour of the cutlery used and how this can affect weight loss clients.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend
hypnotherapy surrey

Practising hypnotherapy in Wallington, Surrey Since 2001

When you use hypnotherapy to lose weight you help the client change beliefs at a core level which has a profound effect on their choices with regards to food and drink.

Wallington, Surrey,UK (PRWEB UK) 29 June 2013

According to the report the perception of how food tastes is influenced by, not only cutlery, but also many other factors. When it comes to weight loss these other factors can have a significant effect on the success of someone trying to lose weight.

The flavour can be affected by the size, weight, shape and colour of the cutlery used, all can have an effect. Other experiments have shown that cheese tastes saltier when eaten from a knife, rather than a fork; while white spoons make yoghurt taste better and a fuller smaller plate satisfies us more than a larger plate with the same amount of food on it.

The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy believes that the brain makes judgements on food even before it goes in the mouth. In their hypnotherapy for weight loss programme they take steps to counter many of these factors.

Paul White, the behavioural change specialist at The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy, and Chairman of the National Council for Hypnotherapy, said “When you use hypnotherapy to lose weight you help the client change beliefs at a core level which has a profound effect on their choices with regards to food and drink.”

“We know the mind plays tricks on us with regards to food and we use hypnotherapy to turn these tricks to the client’s advantage, which actually helps them to lose weight more effectively."

At the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy in Surrey they seek to change their clients’ relationship with food. The hypnotherapist will work with the client to change the way they view food, even the way they think about food, so the client eats to live, rather than lives to eat. By doing so they remove the guilt, reduce consumption and feel happier around food.

Paul White has recently stepped down as Chairman of the National Council for Hypnotherapy, a position he held for five years. He has been a Director of The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy for 11 years. He has a special interest in weight control and problem behaviours (addictions).