Senators Introduce Expedited Disability Insurance Payments for Terminally Ill Individuals Act of 2013, Which Would Shorten Wait for Benefits

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Three United States Senators have introduced a bill to the legislature that is currently known as the Expedited Disability Insurance Payments for Terminally Ill Individuals Act of 2013, which would shorten the waiting period for terminally ill patients to receive Social Security Disability benefits. The attorneys at Rechtman & Spevak, who represent people in matters involving Social Security Disability and whose law firm Web site URL can be found at http://www.rsinjurylawyers.com, would like to help bring awareness to the introduction of this bill and to encourage the voting public to contact their legislators to express their support for it.

Having to wait for five months for their benefits to begin often creates a situation where the patient passes away before any benefits can be obtained.

Rechtman & Spevak is a law firm in Atlanta, Georgia that specializes in representing clients who are facing difficulties with regards to Social Security Disability, or SSD benefits. The firm also helps clients deal with legal issues regarding Georgia workers’ compensation claims as well as clients who face Georgia personal injury matters. Recently, three United States Senators introduced a bill in the legislature that would shorten the timeframe that as of now is required for terminally ill patients to complete before receiving disability benefits. The attorneys at the firm would like to help bring awareness to this bill and to comment on the need for it to become law.

The bill was introduced by Senators John Barasso and Mike Enzi of Wyoming along with Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio. The bill is called the Expedited Disability Insurance Payments for Terminally Ill Individuals Act of 2013. It would change the existing law that as of now requires terminally ill patients to wait for five months before receiving Social Security Disability benefits. The bill came about because of the efforts of a resident of Wyoming, and the story regarding the history of this effort can be found here.

If the bill becomes law, the five-month waiting period for benefits would no longer exist, and instead patients who are deemed to be terminally ill by two independent doctors could receive 50 percent of the benefits available during the first month of the illness. The patient could then receive 75 percent of benefits due during the second month, and from that point the patient would receive full benefits for 10 more months. A patient would be defined as terminally ill under the bill as someone who has a life expectancy of six months or less.

The attorneys at Rechtman & Spevak have been serving clients as Georgia Social Security Disability lawyers for several years, and Jaret A. Spevak, a partner in the firm, believes that this bill is a good idea for many reasons. “People who face terminal illness already have enough to deal with as it is. Having to wait for five months for their benefits to begin often creates a situation where the patient passes away before any benefits can be obtained. Many people in this position pay into the Social Security fund for their entire working lives, and they need all the help they can get when they face this terrible situation.”

About Rechtman & Spevak

Rechtman & Spevak is a Georgia law firm that provides legal representation for people who have been injured in workplace accidents, car accidents and other types of traffic accidents across the state. The firm also handles legal matters that relate to Georgia workers’ compensation, Social Security Disability and Georgia personal injury. David B. Rechtman has been practicing law in Georgia since 1981 and his partner, Jaret A. Spevak, has been a licensed attorney in the state for nearly 20 years. The firm is solely dedicated to matters of litigation. News and updates regarding the firm can be found at https://www.facebook.com/RechtmanSpevak.

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Jaret A. Spevak
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