According to the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy, hangovers affect the mind as well as the body

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In a report released today, the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy highlights recent research that shows how a hangover affects more than just the body.

hypnotherapy surrey

Paul Howard hypnotherapist - anxiety specialist

It’s important to understand that hangovers don’t just affect the body physically, they also affect our cognitive processes and mood as well.

Most people that have woken up after drinking a little too much the night before will have probably noticed the way a hangover affects the minds ability to process mental problems and think clearly.

The report explains how psychologists at the Keele University's School of Psychology, found that apart from causing anxiety, dizziness, feeling sick/vomiting and headaches, hangovers are also detrimental to brain function, affecting one's capability to think properly.

In the report they release research, conducted by the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy, on previous hypnotherapy for anxiety clients that found some surprising links between anxiety and hangovers and how they could be causal in creating anxiety.

Paul Howard, anxiety specialist at the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy and Director of the National Council for Hypnotherapy, said, “It’s important to understand that hangovers don’t just affect the body physically, they also affect our cognitive processes and mood as well. These changes in our mood and ability to process can cause problems at work and in our home life.”

The report explains that it is unreasonable to expect hypnotherapy to remove hangovers but there are ways hypnotherapy can help with the behaviours that cause hangovers in the first place.

However, their hypnotherapy for alcohol programme works with people that have problem behaviours with regards to alcohol by affecting change at a subconscious level at what they describe as the ‘decision points’. These ‘decision points’ are usually not when someone decides that they want a drink but usually long before.

Paul White, the behavioural change specialist at the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy and former Chairman of the National Council for Hypnotherapy, said “The problem is that alcohol is a readily available, legal substance for adults to use. Apart from the hangovers, prolonged or excessive use can lead to dependency problems. Even use of alcohol in small amounts can impair the ability to work machinery or drive safely.”

At the Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy they use hypnotherapy to remove dependency to alcohol. Behavioural change is usually achieved relatively quickly and can normally lead to a permanent resolution. The outcome is not influenced by the length of time the behaviour has taken place in the past.

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